Tag Archive: SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY

  1. CAKE and Volta Trucks join forces to provide world’s first electric microhub for last-mile deliveries

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    LEVA-EU member CAKE and Volta Trucks have announced a joint initiative for providing global fashion giant the H&M Group with fully integrated, electric deliveries to its customers in Paris. Starting in February, the H&M Group will be able to deliver its orders all the way from the warehouses to the door of the customer, leveraging an unparalleled, efficient combination of electric trucks and electric two-wheelers. Tailored for future urban logistics, this solution aims to have a minimum impact on the city environment.

    “As a majority of today’s last-mile delivery chains will soon be banned in many of the world’s largest cities, H&M seeks to engage in future-proof solutions already now. This will enable for contributions of lower emissions and less congestion, while benefiting from far more efficient deliveries all the way to the end customer, paving the way for both healthier cities and business advantages,” says Stefan Ytterborn, founder and CEO, CAKE.

    Rolling hubs, and couriers on two wheels

    CAKE and Volta Trucks were both founded to tackle the modern challenges of transportation. Coming from two different vehicle platforms, yet sharing the same objectives, the integration of the two technologies offers immediate opportunities for e-commerce and the fast-growing delivery industry, now on its way to meeting game-changing laws and regulations globally.

    Volta Trucks, whose vehicles are electric trucks with industry-standard loading capacity, has developed a design that offers emission-free transportation and enhanced safety in urban environments. Allowed to pass through future city borders, the electric trucks make the perfect vessel for carrying full loads of parcels, and harbour in central locations while parcels are delivered last-mile by a set of CAKE bikes reaching the customers fast, without impacting the traffic, or struggling with parking.

    “We’ve designed the full-electric Volta Zero to be the cleanest, safest and most efficient urban delivery vehicle. Most of our customers are using trucks to deliver from out-of-town warehouses to inner-city stores. But as a forward-thinking brand, we’ve always sought innovative partners to deliver new and industry-redefining solutions. The partnership between Volta Trucks, CAKE and H&M Group will showcase how a combination of zero tailpipe emission transport solutions can bring benefits to brands, customers, and city centre environments.” says Essa Al-Saleh, Chief Executive Officer of Volta Trucks.

    “An important part of our approach is to work openly and closely with partners, including to reduce emissions throughout our value chain. Initiatives like those with Volta Trucks and Cake help us advance our sustainability goals faster than we could on our own and have a positive impact in leading the transformation to a better fashion future. This starts with improving sustainability performance in our own operations and demonstrating the resilience of a sustainable business direction”, Paul Ticehurst, H&M Group Logistics Transport Lead.

    Paris leads the way

    Paris is one of the first cities in the world to regulate city transportation in favour of congestion and the climate. The French capital is targeting a late 2023 introduction of legislation, effectively limiting the movement of cars in its city centre. CAKE electric mopeds and motorcycles will be exempt from the ban that is expected to remove approximately 100,000 cars from the streets each day. Additionally, two-wheelers using combustion engines will by September 1st be subject to parking fees, while electric alternatives continue to enjoy free parking on Paris streets.

  2. Institute of Transport Research of the German Aerospace Center invites you to participate in a study

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    We are looking for participants who own a light electric vehicle (LEV, class L5e, L6e or L7e) and would like to tell us more about the use and their experiences with their LEV.

    The research project is investigating what requirements and needs owners have for LEV design. This includes several questions, such as:

    • What do owners like and dislike about using LEVs?
    • From their perspective, what works well and what doesn’t work well?
    • What should be improved and what should be maintained?

    To answer these questions, we are looking for YOU – LEV owners.

    If you are interested in participating, please visit our project website and write an email to the given mail address: DATAMOST: Use patterns of LEVs – DLR Moving Lab 

    (Please note that the language of the study is German.)

    We look forward to your participation!

    The LEV Study Team

  3. First e-cycle hearse created by funeral home in Paris

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    Source: TheMayor.EU, T.V. Iolov

    New innovations see carbon footprint reduced through increasingly unique, scenario-specific technologies.

    The “Le Ciel & La Terre” funeral home in Paris, France will utilize the first electric-bicycle hearse named “Corbicyclette”. Using the new vehicle during funeral proceedings reduces the overall environmental impact of the event. Furthermore, the creation allows many of the capital’s new bicycle-focused regulations to be met, allowing for easier transportation in the city centre.

    According to Le Ciel & La Terre, the hearse is anchored to the platform of an electrically assisted steel three-wheeled bicycle, which gives it the power to take on steep slopes. The airtight compartment intended to accommodate the coffin is made of solid, light, natural and environmentally friendly marine plywood. Being a Light Electric Vehicle, the Corbicyclette does not emit any greenhouse gasses during its operational phase.

    Creator Isabelle Plumereau shared, “The Corbicyclette is to propose a new ritual for families that I accompany, especially at the cemetery,” allowing for “a slow, silent, quiet procession, to the rhythm of the steps of the people who walk behind and who make the procession.”

  4. The future of micromobility – an interview with Laka CEO Tobi Taupitz

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    The future of micromobility is an interesting prospect. Soaring fuel costs, environmental pledges, and changing work habits are already seeing our towns and cities transform thanks to micromobility vehicles. But what next?

    Catch up with LEVA-EU Member Laka’s CEO Tobi Taupitz, as he discusses all things micromobility and how LAKA fits into the equation in the organization’s latest press release.

    What is micromobility?

    Micromobility is here to stay. It’s gone from a buzzword in the technology world to a fixture of our everyday lives. Whether that’s the bike we jump on to get to work, or the e-scooters you see in towns and cities.

    But what does ‘micromobility’ actually mean? Well the dictionary definition says micromobility is “the use of small, low-speed vehicles as a means of personal transport”. Seems straightforward enough.

    Tobi has a more detailed view:

    “For me, micromobility means bikes, cargo bikes, e-scooters & e-mopeds – but you can now see all sorts of interesting use cases that don’t quite fit the description. Micromobility really hones in on short(er) distance travel. The use cases are quite interconnected. You can use an e-moped to deliver a pizza or you can use it to get from A to B.

    I suppose what links micromobility is that these aren’t vehicles primarily used for fun. Even if they are a fun way to get around. So I think what we’re talking about is beating traffic and being smarter about getting from A to B.

    When we think about micromobility insurance customers, it’s the commuter and transportation side on the one hand, and it’s the commercial and business side on the other. This narrows down the segments we are serving in the micromobility space.

    Micromobility is evolving of course. There is a BCG paper that came out in May that predicted what Micromobility will look like by 2030, which was super interesting and insightful. It’s just inspiring how the world is changing.”

    Micromobility stats at a glance

    The paper that Tobi refers to paints an interesting picture of the current micromobility landscape too. Here are the key takeaways:

    • Bike ownership is still expected to be the biggest market by volume at €35 Billion Annually
    • Subscription vehicles are the fastest-growing segments in the micromobility market
    • More than 30% of all their survey respondents use a bike several times a week, if not daily
    • Among city dwellers, 41% use a micromobility vehicle to commute
    • The top six reasons people choose micromobility were of almost equal importance: flexibility, reliability, price, the weather (when it is pleasant), safety, and the opportunity to save time by reducing travel time.

    Bikes clearly play a big role in driving micromobility forwards too. A report from We are Possible found that cargo bikes have the potential to cut emissions by 90% compared to diesel vans and are 60% faster than vans in urban centres.

    This is what Pedal Me have managed to achieve through excellent rider training, operational efficiencies, and using the best cargo bikes for the job.

    What does the future look like for micromobility?

    Tobi says the key to micromobility’s success in the future is having vehicles that can outperform traditional cars & vans.

    “We’re seeing cargo bikes that can carry more and more. It’s really taking off. That’s the use case of the EAV for example. It’s more of a van than an e-bike. This shows that some of the creative solutions are already out there.”

    The EAV that Tobi is referring to is an awesome look into how our cities will soon look. If not how they look already.

    EAV build eCargo vehicles for emerging use cases and new urban environments. Their vehicles are designed down from a van, not up from a bike: a fundamental innovation in eCargo bike design. This unique hybrid allows more deliveries in a shorter amount of time by accessing cycle lanes and pedestrian routes.

    Micromobility vehicles are on the rise but how will this affect our towns and cities? What patterns are we seeing in how people now use urban spaces?

    Whilst catching up with EAV we asked head of partnerships Leo Bethell how he sees the future of our urban spaces:

    “Heavy and large vehicles will be removed from the city centre, as vehicle lanes make way for lightweight micromobility options. Cycle and pedestrian infrastructure will take priority over legacy vehicles meaning people will reclaim the city as a safe environment.”

    Making the city a safe environment is critical. Expect to see initiatives like ‘School Streets’ in the UK become commonplace everywhere. School Streets are council-led schemes that restrict motor traffic access outside schools at key times. This leads to safer access to schools and better use of the space outside school by children and families walking, scooting, cycling, and wheeling to school.

    Expect to see many more initiatives that ‘reclaim’ the streets too. It’s fundamental to making our cities greener and more liveable. Designing our streets for humans first and transport / vehicles second is a powerful way to turn the tables on polluted cities & chaotic urban environments.

    The Laka journey so far…

    And where does Laka fit into all of this? Finally we asked Tobi what sets Laka apart from the rest:

    “Well firstly, being tech-driven we have lots of data points compared to your standard business insurer. We have thousands of cargo bikes on the platform and we know very well what the risk looks like. Price is important, but it’s not everything. Service is essential and can be broken down between the actual claims offering, which we have as best in class, I would argue. And then of course it’s our ability and willingness to go beyond that.

    On the one hand, this would be through the products we are offering, liability cover, goods in transit, and I’m sure more in the future. On the other hand, it’s the integration of the ecosystem we build around your needs and your existing operations. If you have fleet management software for example, Laka just seamlessly integrates, captures the right data and makes it super easy to work with you.”

  5. Join LEVA-EU now for Membership till end 2023

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    LEVA-EU Membership is usually valid for one year from the date that you confirm your affiliation. However, the LEVA-EU board has decided to apply 1 November as a cut-off date for next year’s membership. If you join between 1 November and 31 December 2022, your membership will run until 31 December of the next year.

    Read up on why you should become a member of LEVA-EU here. You will find full details on what we do under “What We Do” in the top menu of the homepage..

    To apply for membership, simply complete and send the online form here or contact LEVA-EU Manager Annick Roetynck for more details or an introductory meeting: annick@leva-eu.com

    We hope we will have the pleasure of welcoming you as a LEVA-EU Member soon!

    The LEVA-EU Team,
    Annick, Bram, Eddie, Dennis, Willow and Bruno

    Photo by Mick Haupt on Unsplash

  6. Research: Traffic increase scenarios where e-bikes and e-scooters are banned

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    Source: Electrek, M. Toll.

    A new study, published in Nature Energy, states that cities should expect to see trade-offs between micromobility restrictions designed to promote public safety, and increased emissions associated with heightened congestion.

    Titled “Impacts of micromobility on car displacement with evidence from a natural experiment and geofencing policy“, the study was created using data from Atlanta, USA. The city made for an ideal research base due to its sudden ban on the usage of shared micromobility devices at night, restricting use between 19:00-04:00 from 9 August, 2019 onwards. This gave the opportunity to compare traffic scenarios before and after the change.

    The study found that, on average, travel times for car trips in Atlanta during evening hours increased between 9.9-10.7% immediately following the ban on shared micromobility. For an average commuter in Atlanta, that translated to an extra 2-5 minutes per evening trip.

    The authors also concluded that the impact on commute times would likely be higher in other cities across the country. According to the study, “based on the estimated US average commute time of 27.6 minutes in 2019, the results from our natural experiment imply a 17.4% increase in travel time nationally.”

    The economic impact of increased commuting times in the city of Atlanta was calculated at US $4.9M per annum. When looking on a national scale, the study estimated this impact to fall in the range of US $408M to $573M per annum.

    Interestingly, the study’s dataset was recorded prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, which of course. played a major role in promoting, and increasing uptake of, shared micromobility. A similar study undertaken in todays’ transport climate could find an even greater burden on congestion, travel times, and economic impact on cities.

  7. Madrid expands e-bike service

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    Source: TheMayorEU, T.V. Iolov

    Authorities are eager to continue the city’s development into a truly cycling-friendly location.

    In 2014, the BiciMAD scheme launched in Madrid, a 100% electric bicycle public service. Now, close to 10 years after its launch, the service will expand into all of the capital’s districts during 2023. This updated service is in line with the ambitious Madrid 360 Environmental Strategy.

    18 million euros is provided to the project by the municipality, with a further 30 million euros provided by the European Union’s Next Generation fund; these resources will be used for the renewal of the e-bike fleet, parking stations, and digital software. The parking points where bikes can be picked up and dropped off will more than double – from 264 to 611, and 4,600 two-wheelers will be added for a total of 7,500 available to residents and guests of the city.

    A particularly noteworthy software update is the development of non-permanent virtual parking stations, which will be used to cover specific large events or quickly service high-demand areas. In a lively city such as Madrid, this allows the service to properly cater to an area’s evolving needs.

  8. White Paper: Strategies to Reduce Employee Mobility Emissions

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    Source: Autonomy

    The new White Paper sees sustainable mobility network Autonomy partner with Capgemini Invent to present a report on Sustainable Corporate Mobility

    The report covers a range of topics, including organization-specific actions, regional initiatives, real-world obstacles, and potential solutions. The full summary, provided by Autonomy, can be read below:

    • How companies have a strong opportunity to impact employees’ mobility choices: Studies suggest that commuting constitutes as much as 98% of an employee’s work-related emissions. Employers have a responsibility to help their employees in reducing their emissions and there are many recent examples of companies rolling out initiatives to promote sustainable commuting habits. Examples of such initiatives from companies such as IKEA are explored throughout the white paper.
    • The origin and current state of corporate mobility regulations in France and other countries: Two and a half years after the Mobility Orientation Law came into force in France, 38% of private sector employers have responded, saying they have deployed a Company Mobility Plan (or FMD, Forfait de Mobilités Durables) within their organization. This is an increase of 12 points compared to 2021. Today, nearly 80% of employers are aware of this system, and 40% of organizations are considering deploying it. While this paper focuses on France as a use case, it also looks into other countries such as the Netherlands and Belgium. 
    • The obstacles companies are facing in developing real corporate mobility strategies:  There are a number of barriers to implementing corporate mobility strategies. For instance, regulations do not directly help companies to develop a corporate mobility strategy. In the case of France, while the LOM offers new features like the FMD (Company Mobility Plan) and the Crédit Mobilité (Mobility Credit), both these features do not directly translate into a majority of companies developing a strategy for corporate mobility. There is a problem with the legislation not sufficiently incentivizing companies to take action quickly.
    • Impactful solutions according to different companies’ constraints:  To address more diverse commuting patterns and incentivize employees to use greener transportation modes, companies usually start by improving their infrastructure, by offering secured parking spots for bikes and installing electric charging stations. In addition to this, companies can also provide subsidized costs to employees to use public transportation. While the current legislative framework is slowly encouraging companies to act on corporate mobility, a solid corporate mobility strategy needs the right governance and mobility solutions developed at the local level, accounting for each site’s characteristics. Lastly, there is an increasing availability of different tools that are available to companies to ease their relationship with third-party providers and change the way they provide corporate mobility plans. 

    Download the full report via the Autonomy website, here.

  9. New Expert Group on Urban Mobility including LEVA-EU begins work

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    To implement the new 2021 EU Urban Mobility Framework, a reinforced platform for dialogue and co-creation of actions was announced. The goal is stronger engagement by Member States and improved dialogue with cities, regions and stakeholders on all urban mobility issues. LEVA-EU is one of the 127 selected participants in the Group.


    Following a call for applications over the summer, EU Commission DG MOVE received more than 150 applications from organisations as well as cities and regions to become members of the reformed Commission Expert Group on Urban Mobility (E03863). LEVA-EU is one of the 25 organisations selected as expert for the new Group. In addition, Member States have nominated their representatives at Ministry level.

    Members were selected following a thorough evaluation process, and, as a result, the group will include representatives of:

    • Organisations (25 stakeholders – Type C members)
    • Cities and regions (25 authorities at regional or local level – Type D members)
    • Member States (27 authorities at national level – Type D members)

    The full list of members is available at the Register of Commission Expert Groups.

    The first Group meeting takes place on 25 October 2022.

    To implement the new 2021 EU Urban Mobility Framework(link is external), a reinforced platform for dialogue and co-creation of actions was announced. The goal is stronger engagement by Member States and improved dialogue with cities, regions and stakeholders on all urban mobility issues.

    Following a call for applications(link is external) over the summer, DG MOVE received more than 150 applications from organisations as well as cities and regions to become members of the reformed Commission Expert Group on Urban Mobility (E03863). In addition, Member States have nominated their representatives at Ministry level.

    Members were selected following a thorough evaluation process, and, as a result, the group will include representatives of:

    • Organisations (25 stakeholders – Type C members)
    • Cities and regions (25 authorities at regional or local level – Type D members)
    • Member States (27 authorities at national level – Type D members)

    The full list of members is available at the Register of Commission Expert Groups.(link is external)

    The first Group meeting will take place on 25 October 2022.

    Photo by Gaurav Jain on Unsplash

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