Tag Archive: speed pedelecs

  1. Stromer and LEVA-EU launch Speed Pedelec White Paper

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    76% of all car trips and 50% of kilometers driven by cars can be replaced by micro-mobility[1], according to research carried out by DLR at the request of LEVA-EU. “As much as 37% of the trips could be done by speed-pedelecs (e-bikes up to 45 km/h),” Tomi Viiala, Co-CEO of myStromer, explains.


    This example – and many more – should convince governments of the huge potential of light electric mobility and encourage them to improve focus on it and use it more frequently. “That’s why, together with LEVA-EU, we’ve invested in a Speed Pedelec White Paper to use as a basis for discussion with local authorities, as well as with European authorities,” says Tomi Viiala. The White Paper provides extensive information about the use of S-pedelecs with numerous concrete cases and figures.

    Examples of countries leading the way in sustainable solutions for commuter traffic are Belgium and Switzerland. Speed-pedelecs, are well integrated in both countries as an example of modern, sustainable traffic. Many commuters are already experiencing the benefits: with an S-pedelec, you can be sure of punctual departure and arrival times, along with a healthy(er) way of moving. Even more than that, S-pedelecs are also cost-saving, energy-efficient and, last but not least, more environmentally friendly than driving a car. The rules for using S-pedelecs in Belgium and Switzerland are therefore clear and offer riders a good alternative to cars. The White Paper is also intended to raise awareness of this issue among traffic planners and to convince fleet managers to offer pedelecs and S-pedelecs to their employees.

    Together with LEVA-EU, myStromer, the market leader in the S-pedelec segment, wants to convince and motivate other European countries to review and clarify their traffic regulations for S-pedelecs. This implies changes in policy and regulations. And there is still work to be done.

    Annick Roetynck, LEVA-EU Manager, adds: “LEVA-EU has commissioned research from DLR into the potential for LEVs to significantly reduce GHG emissions from the transport sector and thus to contribute to climate protection. The research shows that 37% of all car trips could theoretically be replaced with speed pedelecs and 19% of all car kilometres could be substituted by speed pedelec kilometres. Each trip for which an LEV replaces a car would avoid on average 88% of the GHG emissions from the substituted cars. These numbers clearly show that electrification of cars alone is not the solution. We also need to considerably reduce the weight of the vehicles we use for our transportation. The speed pedelec is therefore a very valuable, sustainable solution. Legal bottlenecks are very seriously hampering the technological and market development of speed pedelecs. The White Paper should convince the European, national and local authorities to prioritise those issues.

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      [1] Micromobility includes all electric vehicles subject to Regulation 168/2013 as well as all vehicles excluded from this Regulation. That variety of vehicles ranges from e-scooters to electric mini-cars.

    • Research: analysis of initial speed pedelec usage for commuting purposes in Flanders

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      The 365SNEL project, subsidized by the Flemish Ministry for the Environment is aimed at evaluating the potential of speed pedelecs for commuting. Among the companies who provided material for this project are three LEVA-EU Members: Klever, Qwic and Stromer.

      In the framework of this project Bert Herteleer, Nikolaas Van den Steen, Lieselot Vanhaverbeke en Jan Cappelle have recently published a scientific paper: “Analysis of initial speed pedelec usage for commuting purposes in Flanders”. The abstract is below, the full paper is here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trip.2022.100589

      Speed pedelecs, pedal-powered two-wheelers with motor assistance up to 45 km/h, are relatively new vehicles for active travel on European roads, with Flanders at the forefront of adoption. Policies by European and national entities have allowed speed pedelecs to be used, yet the policies have been based on assumptions and modelling about speeds reached, rather than measured data.

      This paper presents analysis of naturalistic speed pedelec behaviour by 98 individuals at 10 companies in Flanders, who logged commuting and leisure rides with smartphone GPS during three-week test periods as part of the 365SNEL project using fifteen speed pedelecs, ranging in motor power from 250 W to 800 W. The cruising speed, the speed at which the largest distance is covered, and the 95th percentile (P95) speed (as a realistic maximum speed) are proposed as Key Performance Indicators to better evaluate speed pedelec behaviour. Cruising speeds for men were consistently higher than women (mean values: men 38.2 km /h, women 33.5 km /h). For all participants, the mean commuting P95 speed of 40.1 km/h is 5 km/h below the expected 45 km/h, which points to potential over-regulation of speed pedelecs according to their expected maximum speed.

      Contrasting logged commuting cycling trips with leisure trips indicates that speed pedelecs can be characterised by their speed metrics, regardless of their travel purpose. Policymakers can therefore facilitate active travel with its commensurate physical and mental health benefits by investing in and designating routes for higher-speed (active) travel, and conversely reserve other routes for slower travel modes.

    • Stromer ST7 — The world’s first e-bike with Pinion Smart.Shift

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      Maximum range. Maximum power and maximum passion. The ST7 is the new mobility solution for long-distance commuters: With the 1,440 Wh battery, a range of up to 260 km and the electronic Pinion Smart.Shift system, LEVA-EU member Stromer’s latest flagship is setting new standards in the Speed Pedelec market. 

      The Stromer ST7 is the first Speed Pedelec in the world with the new Smart.Shift technology from Pinion.

      Pinion Smart.Shift brings automotive riding dynamics to the e-bike. It combines reliable and virtually maintenance-free gear shifting technology with the advantages of electronic shifting via a shift lever. Shifting at the press of a button – fast, ergonomic and intuitive. The system shifts while riding, at a standstill and under load! It also has other smart functions: The start gear can be selected individually and, thanks to the integrated shifting indicator in the e-bike display, the selected gear is shown while riding. Details about Smart.Shift: https://pinion.eu/smartshift

      Low-maintenance drive combination and extra thrust

      The ST7 is particularly durable and low-maintenance thanks to the 12-gear C1.12 Pinion Smart.Shift drive with robust Gates carbon belt. Stromer‘s new rear-wheel motor (940 W / 52 Nm) not only provides powerful, dynamic and quiet assistance up to 45 km/h, the Sport mode also serves up an extra portion of thrust.

      High-end components – for an incomparable riding experience, range and safety while commuting

      The ST7 combines cutting-edge technology and high-end components to create a premium quality Speed Pedelec in the unmistakable integrated Stromer design. ABS from Blubrake seamlessly integrated into the frame, large-volume Pirelli Angel ST Sport tires, powerful 4-piston brakes from TRP and a high-quality Supernova light system with daytime running light, high beam and brake light offer the greatest possible safety in daily commuter traffic.

      The new BQ1440 battery (48 V/1,440 Wh), Stromer’s most powerful to date, allows long-distance commuters to achieve a range of up to 260 km. The battery can be easily inserted and removed in an instant and, like all Stromer models, can be charged directly or in the bike. The integrated charge level indicator is new on this battery model.

      As an option for added comfort, for example on rougher roads, the ST7 is also available with the upside-down suspension fork from Wren developed specifically for Stromer and/or with a suspension seatpost from Kinekt. With the free OMNI app, the ST7 also has full connectivity via cellular technology with over-the-air updates and smart extras like GPS localization, triple anti-theft protection, service reminder, crash alert, individual motor settings, statistics and more.

      Philip Henry, Product Manager at Stromer,  about the product: “My team and I are proud of the end result of this project: The ST7 doesn’t only once again redefine the limits of what’s possible in the S-Pedelec sector, with this bike we are also offering commuters with a daily commute of over 30 km efficient and environmentally friendly mobility. I truly believe that we will inspire many long-distance commuters with this and convince them to make the switch. In the end they benefit not only from the extraordinary performance and range, they are also getting a bike with state-of-the-art technology in integrated design.

      We are shifting gears into the future! The Stromer ST7 with electronic Pinion Smart.Shift technology heightens the shifting performance to the next level. In close cooperation with Stromer, we have successfully achieved complete system integration including the power supply from the e-bike battery, the display of all settings as well as the gear indicator on the e-bike display via CAN bus,” states Thomas Raith, managing director of Pinion GmbH.

      Availability and price

      The new power pack is available with a sports frame in three sizes (M, L and XL) from fall 2022 in the Launch Edition color Solid Gold as well as from January 2023 in Dark Platinum.

      EUR 12,140 Solid Gold / 12,490 Dark Platinum

      CHF 13,142 Solid Gold / 13,490 Dark Platinum

    • Belgian Speed-Pedelec market recovers

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      After a faltering 2021, with 3.3% less registrations than in 2020, the Belgian speed pedelec market seems to be recovering this year.

      From January to April, a total of 4,225 vehicles were registered, that is 11.7% more than last year. However, recovery only started in March and strengthened in April. In January and February, registrations still went into the red, with – 10.8% and -2.5%. Registrations in March 2022 were 7.5% higher than the year before and April even 15% higher.

      The electric mopeds up to 25 km/h were also successful with an increase of 4.2% to 297 registrations from January til April. Their 45 km/h counterparts however did a lot worse than in 202, i.e. 807 registrations, which is almost 30% less than in 2021.

      Further good news for speed pedelecs in Belgium: it is now finally possible to register a new speed pedelec on the website of the Belgian Office for Vehicle Registation. So far, there was a technical issue due to the fact that speed pedelecs in Belgium are not subject to a motor vehicle insurance>

      Important to note is that it must be explicitly indicated in WebDIV that the registration involves a speed pedelec. This is done by indicating the following two items in the WebDIV application:

      • Speed pedelec: YES
      • Pedal assistance only

      Only when these two elements are selected in WebDIV, the vehicle will be correctly registered as a speed pedelec.

    • Research: Analysis of initial speed pedelec usage for commuting purposes in Flanders

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      Source: Transportation Research Interdisciplinary Perspectives

      New research by Herteleer et al. provides insight into commuter patterns in Flanders, Belgium

      The full research paper may be accessed here. The abstract below provides a synopsis of the researchers’ findings:

      “Speed pedelecs, pedal-powered two-wheelers with motor assistance up to 45 km/h, are relatively new vehicles for active travel on European roads, with Flanders at the forefront of adoption. Policies by European and national entities have allowed speed pedelecs to be used, yet the policies have been based on assumptions and modelling about speeds reached, rather than measured data. This paper presents an analysis of naturalistic speed pedelec behaviour by 98 individuals at 10 companies in Flanders, who logged commuting and leisure rides with smartphone GPS during three-week test periods as part of the 365SNEL project using fifteen-speed pedelecs, ranging in motor power from 250 W to 800 W. The cruising speed, the speed at which the largest distance is covered, and the 95th percentile (P95) speed (as a realistic maximum speed) are proposed as Key Performance Indicators to better evaluate speed pedelec behaviour. Cruising speeds for men were consistently higher than for women (mean values: men 38.2 km /h, women 33.5 km /h). For all participants, the mean commuting P95 speed of 40.1 km/h is 5 km/h below the expected 45 km/h, which points to potential over-regulation of speed pedelecs according to their expected maximum speed. Contrasting logged commuting cycling trips with leisure trips indicates that speed pedelecs can be characterised by their speed metrics, regardless of their travel purpose. Policymakers can therefore facilitate active travel with its commensurate physical and mental health benefits by investing in and designating routes for higher-speed (active) travel, and conversely reserve other routes for slower travel modes.

    • Klever launches two new speed pedelec models

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      LEVA-EU member Klever Mobility launches two new top models utilizing ten years of design experience.

      N Rogue 45 – Discover more here

      Klever injects everything it’s learned over the past ten years into the N. It’s rideable, strong, practical, comfortable, and can carry heavy payloads. Plus, the N Rogue 45 is made mostly with an ever-increasing amount of in-house Klever components.

      The N Rogue 45 stands out for its value in the Klever Mobility range, being the first-speed pedelec retailing under €5,000. The brand new model features a fresh Klever frame design and is equipped with a 1200Wh battery and 600W rear wheel motor. This model is capable of carrying a payloads up to 150 kg, and the XL model is designed for riders up to 205 cm.

      As more and more Klever Mobility parts are made in-house, the brand gains the ability to control all aspects of the bike, ensuring all parts work more efficiently and reliably together. It also allows designers to innovate regardless of industry shortfalls.

      Y Muse 45 – Discover more here

      The new Y Muse 45 is the speed pedelec variant of the previous Y Muse 25 e-bike. The Y Muse 45 gives the rider unexpected high power, a fashionable design, and practical comfort. The model includes relevant safety features, a 600w rear wheel motor and is standard equipped with an 850Wh battery at a €5.299 price point. “If you are looking for everyday excitement, to outsmart the city traffic, or just to enjoy the controlled speed, the Y Muse 45 is your perfect fit.

    • 2020: E-motorcycles & speed pedelecs push European L-category registrations forward

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      Last year, the European motorcycle market only continued to grow thanks to increased sales of electric vehicles. Electric mopeds already achieve a share of more than 20 % in registrations. That is largely to the credit of speed pedelecs.


      2020 was a symbolically important year for electric motorcycles. It was only thanks to them that the total EU market continued to grow. Their registrations jumped from 12,263 to 18,620, almost 52% growth. The registration of internal combustion engine (ICE) motorcycles completely stagnated, despite increased pre-registrations due to the validity of Euro 4 approvals ending on 31 December 2020. The share of electric motorcycles in total registration rose from 1.4 to 2.1%. The Corona-crisis appears to have had a rather beneficial effect on e-motorcycle sales with significant increases in most months except in April, June, October and November.

      Spain remained the largest market with 6,370 registrations, which is plus 7%. The biggest growth however occurred in Italy where registrations were almost 3.5 times higher than in 2019. Italy became the second biggest market with more than 5,600 registrations. In 2020, the country had a € 1.3 million budget for scrapping ICE- and purchasing electric L-category vehicles. France on number 3 booked 30.5% more and Germany 53.6%. France also has a national incentives’ program, while Germany only has measures in place in a few regions.

      Electric moped registrations also increased, but only by 12.5% from 52,000 to 58,500. That was 1% less than then the growth of the total moped market. E-mopeds already have a 21% share in total registrations. It should be taken into account that these number include speed pedelecs.
      In 2 countries, registrations made a major leap of more than 50%. The Netherlands jumped over Belgium to become number one with just under 20,000 registrations. The Netherlands offer extensive tax exemption and deduction for e-vehicles. In Spain, registrations increased from + 5,500 tot + 8,500.

      In two countries, registrations declined: with more than 20% in France to just under 11,000 and with 10% in Belgium to almost 14,400. In reality, the Belgian e-moped registrations only included 1,891 conventional e-mopeds. That was almost 40% less than in 2019. This decline was due to the deletion of the successful Flemish subsidy for e-mopeds (excluding speed pedelecs). Of the Belgian 14,400 registrations last year, 12,500 were speed pedelecs.

      Statistics’ source: ACEM

      Electric Motorcycle Registrations

      Electric Moped Registrations

    • Belgian, Dutch and German LEV Markets 2020

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      The Netherlands

      As for electric bicycle sales in the Netherlands, by the 1 June 2020, a total of 149,000 e-bikes had been sold. This is a 12% increase compared to the first five months of 2019. In the month of  May alone, around 58,000 electric bicycles have been sold, which is an all-time month record and growth of 38.0% compared to May 2019 according a GfK study commissioned by BOVAG.

      In the first nine months of this year a total of 3,754 speed pedelecs (L1e-B) have been sold according to Raivereniging. This represent a growth of around 55.1% compared to 2019 (2,421). At the top of the sales’ charts remains Stromer, who sold most speed pedelecs in the Netherlands both in the first nine months of 2019 and 2020. Gazelle and Riese & Müller came respectively second and third in 2020, switching their 2019 positions.

      Belgium

      Accurate statistics about electric bicycles sales in Belgium are hardly available. However, there is up to date information on the registration of speed pedelecs (L1e-B) at the Dienst Inschrijving Voertuigen (DIV). A total of 9,636 speed have been registered at the DIV in the first 9 months of 2020.  This is a decrease of 3.1% compared to the same period in 2019.

      In Belgium there are 2 types of electric mopeds that are allowed on the road: category A with a maximum design speed of 25 km/h and category B with a maximum design speed of 45 km/h.

      A total of 416 electric A-mopeds have been registered at the DIV in the first nine months in 2020. This is an increase of  28.0% compared to the same period last year. As for electric B-mopeds, a total of 1,553 were registered as opposed to  3,211 registrations for the same period in 2019, that is 51.6%. This bad result is due to the sudden and unexpected decision to stop subsidies for electric mopeds.

      For Belgium and the Netherlands, it is worth noting that the corona lockdown has delayed supplies and therefore also registrations of speed pedelecs and electric mopeds. It remains to be seen whether the backlog will be made up in the rest of the year.

      Germany

      According to data by the German bicycle industry organization ZIV, around 1.1 million e-bikes have been sold in the first six months of 2020. This represents a growth of just under 16% compared to the same period last year. It is unknown to what extend speed pedelecs are included within this data.

      In the case of electric motorcycle registrations, there were a total of 1,045 pieces registered in Germany this year. Compared to the same period in 2019, that is a slight increase of just over 3.5% according data by ACEM.

      Photo by Chris Liverani on Unsplash

    • TRL research on factor 4 questions current type-approval for speed pedelecs

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      There is no evidence that the maximum assistance factor 4 has any effect on the safety of speed pedelecs. And, the scope of Regulation (EU) No 168/2013 does not cater for the many variants of electric bicycles and the possibilities that exist to modify those vehicles. Those are the 2 main findings of TRL’s research into factor 4, carried out at the request of the European Commission.

      At the Motorcycle Working Group meeting of 25 September, Ianto Guy has presented the findings of the TRL study into factor 4 for speed pedelecs. There is no evidence that the regulation of the assistance factor has any effect, either positive or negative on the safety of cycles designed to pedal in L1e-B.

      This finding results from the analysis of the very few scientific papers on the issue. According to TRL, in their papers, Erik Gross and Bram Rotthier did not provide definitive evidence for or against the idea that the assistance factor has a direct effect on safety. They did however demonstrate that factor 4 allows for cruising speeds, which are significantly less than 45 km/h. That is the heart of the whole matter.

      In 2013, factor 4 was proposed by CONEBI because the CONEBI members at that time believed that a cruising speed of + 30 km/h would serve three purposes. At a time when there were hardly any speed pedelecs on the market yet, they thought that 30 km/h would be sufficient to please those consumers who were looking for a slightly more sportive electric bike. Secondly, they believed it would be adequate to convince the authorities not to impose a moped helmet on the riders of these vehicles. And last but not least, it enabled them to bring a variation of their existing 25 km/h – 250Wpedelecs on the market without too much R&D effort.

      Since then however, there are a few brands on the market who use a factor higher than 4, which allows their customers to achieve cruising speeds much closer to 45 km/h. It turns out that there is a market for such speed pedelecs, since the brands concerned are quite successful. Consumers are very well aware of the difference between the two different types of speed pedelecs, as appears clearly from the Belgian project 365SNEL. In this project, around 120 test riders have been commuting on a speed pedelec for 3 weeks. People tend to use a speed pedelec rather than a 25 km/h when they live further than 15 km away from work. Some of them commute over quite long distances. In those cases, a speed pedelec with a cruising speed of 30 km/h is not up for competition  with a car, whereas a speed pedelec with at cruising speed of 40 km/h is.

      TRL has also found that the current type-approval legislation obstructs the market development of speed pedelecs. TRL states: “The process of measuring assistance factor as part of the type approval process is difficult for manufacturers to comply with because there are very few test houses with the equipment required to undertake the relevant tests or a full understanding of how the Regulations should be applied.” This is exactly why LEVA-EU has been opposing factor 4: it is an unnecessary requirement, which results in unnecessary costs for companies who want to bring speed pedelecs to the market.

      TRL also states: “The scope of Regulation (EU) No 168/2013 does not cater for the many variants of electrically assisted bicycles and the possibilities that exist to modify those vehicles. This has had the effect of permitting vehicles that do not comply with either the spirit or letter of the Regulations to be sold legally but then operated illegally on the road in the EU.” This is what LEVA-EU has been arguing consistently and incessantly: the current type-approval procedure for electric bicycles is an inaccurate law which does not ensure safe vehicles. Because the type-approval prescribed by this law is totally inaccurate, exceedingly complicated and incredibly expensive, many companies opt to skirt the law through a variety of solutions to get to higher speeds.

      Based on this research, TRL formulated a number of recommendations. The principle recommendation which was welcomed most by LEVA-EU was: “Given that cycles designed to pedal are intended to have a very different character to other vehicles in the L1e-B sub-category it would seem appropriate to separate them into a sub-category of their own. (…)” And TRL concluded with this recommendation: “Given the limited maximum speed of cycles designed to pedal in L1e-B, consideration should be given to the appropriateness of national regulations that require cycles designed to pedal in L1e-B to use roads rather than purpose built cycle infrastructure. This perhaps requires a separate investigation to understand the potential conflicts that might arise from cycles designed to pedal being permitted to us cycle paths and cycles designed to pedal using roads.

      The European Commission is yet to release the full study. However, at the Motorcycle Working Group meeting they briefly commented and concluded: “We can assess the categorization of these vehicles and aim for a type-approval that facilitates these vehicles.

      The first draft of Regulation 168/2013 was issued in 2009. On this 10th anniversary, there is finally hope that the European Union will embark on the development of a technical framework for electric bicycles that is accurate, well-founded and accessible for all companies, big and small, who wish to bring electric bicycles, other than 25 km/h – 250W, to the market. Despite the fact that there numbers in Europe are still limited, it has already been clearly proven that these vehicles can make a significant contribution to making mobility more sustainable.

      For more background information on factor four, please read: LEVA-EU welcomes long awaited TRL research into factor 4

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