Tag Archive: Light electric vehicles

  1. LEV4Climate published in World Electric Vehicle Journal

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    We are very pleased to announce that “Potentials of Light Electric Vehicles for Climate Protection by Substituting Passenger Car Trips” has been published in World Electric Vehicle Journal (WEVJ) as part of the Special Issue EVS35—International Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exhibition (Oslo, Norway). The study was commissioned by LEVA-EU and carried out by Simone Ehrenberger, Isheeka Dasgupta, Mascha Brost, Laura Gebhardt and Robert Seiffert.

    The study is available online:

    Abstract: https://www.mdpi.com/2032-6653/13/10/183
    HTML Version: https://www.mdpi.com/2032-6653/13/10/183/htm
    PDF Version: https://www.mdpi.com/2032-6653/13/10/183/pdf
    Special Issue:
    https://www.mdpi.com/journal/wevj/special_issues/EVS35_International_Electric_Vehicle_Symposium_Exhibition

    The WEVJ is the first peer-reviewed international scientific journal that covers all studies related to battery, hybrid, and fuel cell electric vehicles comprehensively.

    It is the official journal of the World Electric Vehicle Association (WEVA) and its members the European Association for e-Mobility (AVERE), the Electric Drive Transportation Association (EDTA), and the Electric Vehicle Association of Asia Pacific (EVAAP).

    Since its foundation in 2007, the journal has aimed to provide a publishing platform for the academic and industrial world to share the latest developments and knowledge about electric vehicles.

    It publishes the best papers selected from EVS free of charge each year. Besides that, regular submissions are also welcome. The main topics of the journal include, but are not limited to the following:

    • Vehicles & Transportation Systems
    • Automated and Connected Car Concepts
    • Electric and Hybrid Power Train and Its Components
    • Batteries Developments
    • Charging Infrastructure, incl. Wireless Power Transfer and Grid Interaction (V2G)
    • Market Development Strategies
    • Consumer Demand
    • Public Policies and Strategies
    • Energy & Environmental Analyses
    • Mobility Concepts
    Click here for WEVJS’s articles for online reading and download

    The WEVJ is open access so no payment or registration is required.

  2. Uni-Kassel Symposium: light mobility as a building block for the transport turnaround

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    Every car journey has a green alternative – this is the thesis of the Kassel research project “Mobility with a human touch – light mobility for environmental and climate protection, urban and quality of life”. As part of the research, the university organized a three-day symposium. LEVA-EU Manager Annick Roetynck was one of the participants.


    The project at the Department of Transport Planning and Systems, headed by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Carsten Sommer, aims to define and establish the term “FeinMobilität” as an important component of the transport turnaround. Existing and upcoming vehicle concepts such as micromobiles, cycles, velomobiles, cabin scooters, minicars, … are analysed as an alternative to the conventional, ever larger and heavier motor vehicle.

    The German term “Feinmobilität” was not yet wholeheartedly accepted during the symposium. It is clear however that the wide variety of light, electrical vehicles in and outside the L-category need their own name. Without that proper name, it is difficult to communicate about this particular group of vehicles.

    As part of the project, a symposium with more than 60 experts took place from 26 to 28 September at the University in Kassel. The participants came from the production and development of fine mobility vehicles, from relevant industries and associations, research, traffic law, infrastructure planning and the communications industry.

    The symposium consisted of discussion rounds on topics such as legislation, infrastructure, communication, …, in which experts made statements which were followed by further discussions. Among the presenters were Masha Brost, who presented the LEV4Climate study, commissioned by LEVA-EU, whilst Annick Roetynck explained EU legislation on light vehicles. The event concluded with a panel discussion on the opportunities and obstacles for fine mobility.

    Below is an anthology of some striking statements/conclusions formulated in the symposium. In the discussions there was great unanimity among the participants, despite their very different backgrounds, about the fact that automobility is placing a heavy burden on our society, not only through emissions but also through the increasing size and ditto weight of vehicles. The urgent need for smaller, lighter vehicles ran like a thread through this three-day event.

    • All mobility damages society, so it comes down to minimising that damage.
    • It is important to calculate what mobility in its current form costs society.
    • Motorists perceive speed limits as infringing on their freedom, but those limits secure the freedom of all other road users.
    • Wherever a car parks, a child can no longer play.
    • Measures to reduce emissions from motorised traffic alone are not enough and sometimes backfire. European legislation on CO2 emissions from motorised vehicles does not include measures to reduce vehicle weight. Electric cars are granted zero emissions. Consequently, you can easily produce heavier electric cars and be rewarded with zero emissions.
    • In Germany, electric cars enjoy subsidies of more than €9,000. Nothing is available for microcars in L7 or other light vehicles, in L5 and L6. Thus, heavy mobility is subsidised on the basis of ecological arguments while light mobility is being ignored.
    • The European Union prioritises reducing emissions from cars on the road in the belief that this is the fastest path to decarbonisation by 2030. Emission reduction through vehicle weight reduction is not on the agenda.
    • Mobility policies should be based on both environmental and economic principles. Economic here means the pursuit of maximum prosperity using as few scarce resources as possible.
    • Weight-regulating measures are essential to reduce the damage of today’s mobility to society.
    • European type approval is so complex that large manufacturers are not interested in entering the European Union market with new L-category vehicles including minicars. They have no guarantee of large sales and therefore prefer going to the Asian market.
    • Legislation becomes too complex by trying to fit all light vehicles into existing legislation.
    • Light vehicles are extremely (strictly) regulated if you compare it to cars, for example.
    • Parking policies should be adjusted with a view to discouraging large, heavy cars and encouraging small, light vehicles through pricing policies but also by providing fewer parking spaces.
    • Light mobility does not exist in communication. Making light mobility visible is a first step in communication.
    • Light vehicles are not visible in statistics.
    • There is a research deficit. Science should raise its hand to indicate what needs to done to support light mobility.
  3. Personal Mobility Devices Workshop – Commission: quo vadis?

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    The very well-attended European Commission workshop on Personal Mobility Devices (PMD) left us with mixed feelings. It is far from clear which direction the Commission wants to take further.


    Attendance was high for the Commission’s workshop on Personal Mobility Devices (PMDs). There were more than 70 people in the Brussels’ meeting room and about 150 attendants online. Unfortunately, the meeting could not really pass as a workshop. The Netherlands, France, Germany and Spain were given extensive time to present their national rules, mainly for e-scooters. After that, there was hardly any time left for discussion.

    Also, it is not clear what the purpose of presenting those national rules was. The workshop was organised by the Commission unit, which is responsible for Regulation 168/2013. E-scooters, along with electric bicycles and self-balancing vehicles, do not fall under Regulation 168/2013 but under the Machinery Directive. Consequently, one would expect that the Commission unit competent for the Machinery Directive would have at least attended the meeting. Quod non.

    Mark Nicklas, who became Head of the unit responsible for Regulation 168/2013 not that long ago, stated that he himself was not so sure where the current legislation came from. He argued that Regulation 168/2013 had been introduced at a time when PMDs did not really exist yet. However, electric bicycles, e-scooters and self-balancing vehicles were already on the market in 2013. The Commission deliberately excluded them from Regulation 168/2013 because they simply did not know what to do with them. Moreover, they did not realise that by excluding them, they were referring the vehicles to the Machinery Directive. Even almost 10 years later, Mark Nicklas admitted that he was very surprised, when he took on his new position, to find that the vehicles were covered by the Machinery Directive.

    Nevertheless, the Netherlands, Germany and Spain explained at length the specific national technical rules they had developed, because they believe there is no European framework. So, they simply ignore the Machinery Directive as the current European harmonized framework for PMDs excluded from Regulation 168/2013. At the same time, through the Council, these very same member states have overruled the Commission’s proposal to exclude PMDs from the new Machinery Regulation to create an opportunity for a specific harmonized technical framework for PMDs.

    It is particularly unfortunate and incomprehensible that with this workshop, the Commission did not address the member states on their illogical and possibly illegal national rules. It is particularly unfortunate and incomprehensible that the Commission did not seize the opportunity of this workshop to start a real discussion on a European harmonized PMD framework. Nevertheless, the few companies that managed to get the floor, clearly expressed their despair at having to make a different vehicle for almost every member state. One of them was Nathan Debaets, from Taito a young Belgian company and member of LEVA-EU, which is enthusiastically developing a high-quality e-scooter. He stated: “It is nearly impossible for a start-up like ours to follow up on all those different requirements.

    The Light Electric Vehicle (LEV) sector has been plagued and hampered by legal obstructions for over a decade now. In these times of climate, energy and cost-of-living crises, it is no longer morally justifiable for the European Union to continue to shelve a European LEV-framework.

  4. LEVA-EU calls on Commission to speed up review LEV-legislation

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    On 14 September 2022, the European Commission will hold a workshop on the technical requirements and road safety for so-called Personal Mobility Devices (PMD). The term PMD covers all electric cycles, including cargocycles and speed pedelecs, e-scooters, self-balancing vehicles, electric skateboards, etc. In a letter to the Commission, LEVA-EU has expressed serious concerns about the workshop and about LEV-legislation in general.


    In the letter to the Commission, LEVA-EU explained that Regulation 168/2013 as well as the Machinery Directive are very severely hampering the market development of LEVs. The trade association is confronted with these legal bottlenecks on a daily basis, through questions and issues reported by its members. Furthermore, the inadequacy of the current technical framework for LEVs was confirmed by the TRL-study carried out for the Commission and presented in March 2021.

    In March 2021, TRL presented to the Commission, Member States and stakeholders, among which LEVA-EU, their “Study on market development and related road safety risks for L-category vehicles and new personal mobility devices“. In that study, TRL formulated a number of important findings and recommendations. Just to quote a few:

    • The current 250 W limit applied to EPACs is too low for the heavier pedal assisted cargo bikes that are now growing in popularity.
    • The L1e-A subcategory (electric cycles up to 25 km/h but more than 250W) has failed to attract manufacturers and consumers.
    • The business model of many PMD manufacturers is incompatible with the type-approval system.
    • On the question of traffic rules, there is support for the development of an EU harmonised approach.

    TRL concluded that technical regulation outside the Machinery Directive and Regulation 168/2013, tailored to the needs of the PMD industry was the best way forward . The system could include a variety of assessment methods, ranging from self-certification to independent testing. TRL concluded further: “In our view this new system for the regulation and approval of PMDs would provide the flexibility necessary to support innovation in this rapidly evolving sector, while maintaining technical standards and road safety.

    In the letter to the Commission, LEVA-EU expressed its surprise and confusion about the content of the workshop. Even though the TRL study covered all so-called PMDs and also made recommendations for all of them, the workshop deals almost exclusively with e-scooters. Moreover, this workshop is not organised as a dialogue with the LEV-businesses on the many regulatory problems they are facing and how they might be solved. The workshop programme consists mainly of the presentation of national e-scooter legislation in 3 member states.

    LEVA-EU fails to understand why the programme is only focused on vehicles that are not covered by Regulation 168/2013, but by the Machinery Directive. The organisation also doesn’t understand what the purpose is of explaining national legislation that, in their opinion, is at least in breach of Article 6.1 of the Machinery Directive and possibly also of Directive 2015/1535.

    In a prompt reply, the Commission also stated surprise by LEVA-EU’s reaction to the workshop. The Commission explained that this workshop is focused on e-scooters “due to their recent substantial market size growth, increasing safety concerns and the diverging national measures regulating them across the EU.” However, the Commission reassured LEVA-EU that the workshop is only a first step and the discussions will not be limited to e-scooters: “The discussions will build on the findings of the TRL study on L-category vehicles and PMDs and are aimed as a preliminary step in the analysis of potential common rules on PMDs.” Furthermore, the Commission announced a dedicated impact assessment for 2023 that will include an extensive consultation of all actors of the PMD and L-category sectors.

    LEVA-EU will continue to urge the Commission to speed up the legislative review for the benefit of LEVs and to hear the voice of the LEV-sector. In the past few weeks, LEVA-EU has called on the whole LEV-sector to participate in the workshop to have their say on how EPACs, Electric Cargo Cycles, Speed Pedelecs, E-Scooters, Self-Balancing Vehicles, … need their own accurate legal framework without any futher delay. In the framework of the energy and cost of living crises, as well as the Green Deal, the Fit for 55 Package, the New Urban Mobility Framework, the European Climate Pact and many more EU policies, it can no longer be justified that LEVs are neglected for so long and to this extent. We need solutions NOW.

    Fur further details, please contact LEVA-EU Manager, Annick Roetynck, tel. +32 9 278 45 46, email annick@leva-eu.com.

  5. Commission Workshop on LEV-Legislation: registration to close on 8 September

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    On 14 September 2022, the European Commission will hold a workshop on the technical requirements on road safety for so-called Personal Mobility Devices (PMD). The term PMD covers all electric cycles, including cargocycles and speed pedelecs, e-scooters, self-balancing vehicles, electric skateboards, etc. LEVA-EU calls on the whole LEV-sector to participate in the workshop and have a say about current and future LEV-legislation.


    This workshop is a one-off opportunity to make it clear to the European Commission that the current legislation is not adapted to light electric vehicles (LEVs) and therefore hinders their market development and uptake. LEVA-EU therefore warmly appeals to all companies, manufacturers, importers, distributors, as well as user groups involved, to seize this opportunity to testify that PMDs are currently severely hampered by a lack of proper legislation and to demand harmonised and accurate European legislation for these vehicles. The workshop will take place both physically in Brussels and online. Registration closes on 8 September, 12:00 CEST: https://bit.ly/3APEupl.

    In March 2021, TRL presented to the Commission, Member States and stakeholders, among which LEVA-EU, their “Study on market development and related road safety risks for L-category vehicles and new personal mobility devices“. In that study, TRL formulated a number of important findings and recommendations. Just to quote a few:

    • The current 250 W limit applied to EPACs is too low for the heavier pedal assisted cargo bikes that are now growing in popularity.
    • The L1e-A subcategory (electric cycles up to 25 km/h but more than 250W) has failed to attract manufacturers and consumers.
    • The business model of many PMD manufacturers is incompatible with the type-approval system.
    • On the question of traffic rules, there is support for the development of an EU harmonised approach.

    TRL concluded that technical regulation outside the Machinery Directive and Regulation 168/2013, tailored to the needs of the PMD industry was the best way forward . The system could include a variety of assessment methods, ranging from self-certification to independent testing. TRL concluded further: “In our view this new system for the regulation and approval of PMDs would provide the flexibility necessary to support innovation in this rapidly evolving sector, while maintaining technical standards and road safety.

    Following this study, LEVA-EU submitted to the Commission a very extensive Position Paper on how EU rules and regulations for Personal Mobility Devices (PMDs) could be easily formulated into a simple but accurate legal framework, specifically for PMDs. The Commission responded: “We will carefully review and provide a detailed reply to your position paper.” That detailed reply never came. When we contacted the Commission to enquire after their response, we were told that at that time car emission issues had priority. On that occasion it was announced that there would be a workshop in the second half of 2022.

    LEVA-EU is, to say the least, very surprised by the content of that workshop. The TRL study explicitly covered All PMDs and also clearly stated that the legislation for ALL PMDs needs to be revised. The September workshop, however, seems to focus one-sidedly on e-scooters. There is no mention in the programme of any planning for a review of the legislation. The Netherlands, France and Germany are each allowed to explain their national rules for e-scooters which, in our opinion, are in direct conflict with European legislation. And before the Commission enters into discussion with the participants, only one e-scooter manufacturer is allowed to comment on technical aspects and regulatory compliance. You read it correctly: ONE.

    In the framework of the energy crisis as well as the Green Deal, the Fit for 55 Package, the New Urban Mobility Framework, the European Climate Pact and many more EU policies, it can no longer be justified that LEVs are neglected to this extent. We need solutions NOW.

    LEVA-EU therefore calls upon all LEV-stakeholders to attend the Commission’s Workshop of 14 September 2022, either live in Brussels or online. Do not miss this unique opportunity to have your say on how your EPAC, Electric Cargo Cycle, Speed Pedelec, E-Scooter, Self-Balancing Vehicle Business needs its own accurate legal framework without any futher delay. Register before 8 September, 12 CET, here: https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/63d8a542-d4b1-17e4-4159-fad262171bff

    Fur further details, please contact LEVA-EU Manager, Annick Roetynck, tel. +32 9 278 45 46, email annick@leva-eu.com.

  6. So nice to see you (again) at Eurobike

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    The LEVA-EU team thoroughly enjoyed the many meetings with members, candidate members and other parties interested in Light Electric Vehicles (LEVs) at Eurobike this year. Having live discussions about innovations, market expansion, sustainable policies, rules and regulations, changing public opinion, … was so refreshing and inspiring. However, we still don’t understand why we all had to move.

    Throughout the meetings, LEVA-EU received many compliments on the work done so far and just as many encouragements to keep up the good work. There is still a lot of work left to do in many different fields: e-cargocycles, speed pedelecs, e-trailers, e-scooters, … Eurobike convinced us of the fact that LEVA-EU is on the right track in fighting the LEV-corner.

    On the Thursday, in the traditional info-meeting, LEVA-EU presented an update on important European regulatory issues involving electric bicycles and other light, electric vehicles. The agenda included the review of technical legislation for E-Bikes and all other LEVs, state of play in standardization, the EU proposal for a new battery Regulation and the DLR-report on emission saving potential of LEVs. Please contact LEVA-EU Manager Annick Roetynck, annick@leva-eu.com, if you are interested in receiving the presentation.

    All in all, this Eurobike was suitably different from all other editions. At last, it is no longer a bicycle show, it has now finally started to reflect the large diversity of LEVs available on the market to cater for a variety of use and users. Only on Friday afternoon, we made it to the outdoor test-track where we feasted our eyes on a vast range of (sometimes crazy) vehicles with 1, 2, 3 or more wheels. A truly exciting sight!

    And yet, we are not entirely happy with some of the fundamental changes that Eurobike has undergone. The Messe is monstrously large and it takes up a lot of time to get from one hall to another. The lay-out is very confusing and some halls are not exactly attractive. LEVA-EU was forced to resort to a meeting room off hall 9.1.  Although it was a quiet place to meet and catch one’s breath, we were completely excluded from the fairground itself. Many people found it difficult to find us. Also, according to several companies, who either had a stand this year or were considering taking a stand next year, participation is far more expensive than in Friedrichshafen. Furthermore, some prospective exhibitors were turned down because, allegedly, there was not enough room. Unusual policy, considering there was clearly enough free space available to accommodate more exhibitors.

    The question is also how much bigger Eurobike wants to become. There are still some halls available, but it was already impossible for professional visitors to see everything in three days. The question also seems to be whether there is really a need for more square metres or rather for finetuning the exhibition concept? Also, Frankfurt has not proven that it was really necessary to move house. What is the added value of the new location? Our travel-time has been reduced with a few hours but we, for one, would gladly return to Friedrichshafen. There, we have our familiar holiday home, our preferred restaurants and a heavenly spot on the lakeshore where we can enjoy the sunset over a glass of wine after the fair. We still do not understand why we had to give all this up for Frankfurt.

    As for visitors, this edition of Eurobike did not do better than the last edition before COVID, which was in 2019. This year, the fair welcomed 33,780 visitors compared to 39,834 in 2019, that is still more than 15% less. On Saturday and Sunday, 27,370 consumers came round to see the show, compared to 21,240 in 2019. That is almost 30% more but the 2019 show only had 1 day, this year there were two public days.

    Next year, Eurobike is planned in the penultimate week of June. Who has been consulted about this? Certainly not the many dealers who will have to leave their shop for an exhibition in THE busiest time of the year. And what about all the parents who, in that period, are on call to support their children in exams or who are expected to attend long-awaited proclamations? The dates have been chosen with a view to linking Eurobike to the German National Cycling Congress on 20 and 21 June. Federal Mobility Minister Volker Wissing stated: “Next year we are going to combine two major dates for the cycling community in Germany and therefore create more and better opportunities for an exchange between professionals, cycling enthusiasts and policymakers. My goal is to have us all pulling together at our National Cycling Congress to make it easier for people to choose sustainable modes of transport. This includes systematically closing gaps in the cycling network and improving the relationship between bicycles and other vehicles. Since Eurobike follows right after, I’m hoping for plenty of input for digital and innovative solutions. I’m looking forward to a successful event in Frankfurt.

    Unfortunately, the Minister seems to forget that Eurobike is an international exhibition, so it might prove tricky to get Chinese, American or even French trade visitors interested in a German national cycling congress. Moreover, trade visitors are at Eurobike for doing business. It proves to be very difficult to attract their attention for anything that takes their focus away from that business. Time will have to tell whether the National Cycling Congress delegates will be an interesting addition to the traditional public of Eurobike trade visitors.

  7. Dott reports rapidly-rising e-scooter use across Europe

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    Source: MicromobilityBiz, R. Morley

    Micromobility operator and LEVA-EU member Dott has reported a rapid rise in the use of its fleet of e-scooters and e-bikes across Europe, as the peak summer season gets underway.

    The total number of rides increased by 73% in Q2 compared to Q1, and year-on-year was up by 192%.

    Dott attributes this growth to a sharp rise in new riders, which have increased by 116% compared to Q1.

    Henri Moissinac, co-founder and CEO of Dott, stated: “The summer season provides a great opportunity for more people to try our shared e-scooter and e-bike services for the first time. Our riders are quick to realise that our vehicles can transform their travel experience, using our service for efficient, fun and reliable travel on a more regular basis.”

    Dott has over 50,000 vehicles in place across major European cities, with its e-bikes, which were launched at the end of 2021, gaining popularity alongside the existing e-scooters.

    Rider experience has been captured, with 58% of new riders saying a key reason for trying Dott is to save time, 53% that they are fun to ride, and 52% saying that the vehicles are easy to use and readily available.

    Dott puts the environment and social impact to the fore, saying that it is working to reuse, upcycle or recycle 100% of used vehicles and parts, and aims for vehicles to have a five-year-plus lifespan. In addition, Dott is targeting 100% electric logistics fleet and renewable energies in all the cities it operates in, and works with local organisations and communities to make access to its services as wide as possible.

  8. Europe’s transport volumes and its CO2 emissions see a rise over 5% in 19 years

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    Source: European Environment Agency

    Recent analysis by the European Environment Agency (EEA) has reported an increase in greenhouse gas emissions from passenger cars and heavy goods vehicles in line with the growth in transport volumes on Europe’s roads over the past two decades.

    The EEA assessment ‘Decarbonising road transport — the role of vehicles, fuels and transport demand’ is part of the  ‘Transport and environment reporting mechanism’ (TERM) series of annual assessments and focuses on greenhouse gases. According to EEA data, between 2000 and 2019, CO2 emissions from passenger cars in the 27 EU Member States increased by 5.8 %, while emissions from heavy goods vehicles increased by 5.5 %. This was due to growing transport volumes and despite advances in fuel efficiency and an increase in biofuel usage.

    Passenger mobility and haulier preferences are yet to change in Europe. Both transport types have maintained and increased their volumes on the road systems, and the efficiency of vehicles’ CO2 emissions, and shifts to greener transport modes, need addressing.

    Electric vehicles are set to play an important role in improving our air quality. Increasing the volume of these engine types will help to decarbonize passenger and freight logistics, although the EEA assessment reports that efficiency-gains are not the simple solution to the greenhouse gas problems. Ride-sharing, fuller cargo loads and encouraging the use of public transport, cycling and walking are also required to decarbonise Europe’s mobility system.

    To support the overall climate neutrality target, the EU goal is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from transport by 90% by 2050, compared with 1990 levels.

  9. Micro launches configurator for its long-awaited Microlino

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    Pricing starts from CHF 14‘990 incl. VAT in Switzerland

    Europe base price will be approximately EUR 12‘500 excluding VAT. Exact prices per country will be announced with the respective launch in that country

    A fully equipped Pioneer with a medium battery pack starts at CHF 20‘990 incl. VAT

    Swiss customers have to make a refundable deposit of CHF 500 to secure their spot on the waiting list

    Deposits in other markets will be launched step by step, depending on market entry in that country

    First test drive events will be announced at the end of June

    The Swiss company Micro has launched its long-awaited configurator today. The more than 30‘000 reservation holders are able to configure the vehicle starting from today. The Microlino marks a new product category between a motorbike and a car aimed to be a more eco-friendly and space-saving alternative to cars. With 12.5kW nominal power, 230l of trunk volume, and up to 230km of range, the Microlino is best in class in the European L7e and L6e vehicle categories. It also is the only vehicle in this category to have a unibody chassis, that improves quality, longevity, and safety compared to conventional tubular frames normally used in the L7e class.

    But not just its design and the features are unique: due to the light weight that enables the use of a smaller battery, the Microlino has only about one-third of the carbon footprint of a conventional electric car. In addition, the Microlino is produced in Italy and 90% of its parts are produced in Europe, making its supply chain more sustainable. “This is why the Microlino is probably the most sustainable weather-protected vehicle in existence”, says founder Oliver Ouboter.

    Along with the configurator, Micro is releasing the official list prices for the Microlino in Switzerland. Prices will start at 14‘990 CHF including VAT. In Europe, prices will start from approximately 12‘500 EUR excluding VAT. The exact list prices including VAT will be communicated closer to the official launch in the various countries. “Despite the challenges in the worldwide supply chain and multiplication in prices of certain raw materials and doubling in battery prices, we are satisfied to launch a premium and unique light electric vehicle at an affordable price“, says Co-Founder Merlin Ouboter.

    The launch edition is called „Pioneer Series“ and is limited to 999 vehicles as an homage to Micro being founded in 1999, with the invention of the first Kickscooter. It is available in two colors only available in the Pioneer Series called Torino Aluminium and Atlantis Blue. All Pioneer Series will be equipped with the medium 10.5kWh battery pack with a range of up to 177km, the sunroof for the ultimate Summer feeling, Infinity-LED Lightbars with integrated blinkers front and rear, premium vegan leather and Alcantara interior, portable Bluetooth speakers, the storage pack and will each have a unique number visible on the inside. In addition, they will all come with an original Micro Kick scooter in the trunk to cover the last mile. The Pioneer Series will have a price of 20‘990 CHF including VAT or roughly 18‘500 EUR excluding VAT in European countries. “The Pioneer Series is for the true Pioneers that want to help make mobility more eco-friendly and space-saving. Because let’s face it: we have to make mobility not only electric but also lighter and smaller“, says Wim Ouboter, who founded Micro in 1999.

    Swiss customers are asked to make a deposit of 500 CHF to secure their spot on the waiting list. Next, they will be selected based on their location, configuration, and reservation date to make their final order. Micro plans to do a series of test-drive events to make sure that as many customers as possible can test drive the Microlino. The exact dates and locations of these events will be announced at the end of June. By then, Micro will also give all details about the service and sales net in Switzerland. The first deliveries will take place from Micro‘s own brand center near Zurich this Summer.

    Customers outside of Switzerland can for now use the configurator and make a reservation without a deposit. Once deliveries in a market are near, these customers to have to make a deposit to secure their spot in the waiting line. The next markets that will be launched are Germany and Italy. First deliveries for these two markets are expected by the end of 2022.

    The company targets to produce up to 1500 vehicles this year in a factory that it is operating in Turin, Italy, together with its partner CECOMP. Eventually, the company will be able to produce up to 10,000 vehicles in this factory per year. “The demand that we see is huge and we are considering increasing our capacity even further in the future. For this year, we focus on quality, not quantity“, says Oliver Ouboter. The first customer deliveries in Switzerland will take place this summer, and German and Italian deliveries will start towards the end of 2022.

    All Technical Specifications:

    Max. Speed                                                                            90 km/h

    Acceleration (0-50km/h)                                                   5 s

    Nominal Power                                                                      12.5 kW

    Peak Power                                                                             19 kW

    Torque                                                                        89 Nm

    Range                                                                                       91/177/230 km*

    Batteries                                                                                   6 kWh, 10.5 kWh, 14 kWh**

    Charging Time 0-80%                                                           4h (6 kWh Battery)

    3h (10.5 kWh battery)

    4h (14 kWh battery)

    Battery chemistry                                                                 Lithium-Ion (NMC/NCA)

    Curb weight                                                                             435 kg (excl. battery)

    Seats                                                                                          2

    Trunk volume (l)                                                                    230 l

    *Preliminary data
    **Available Q1/23

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