Tag Archive: TRAFFIC SAFETY

  1. Dutch Government introduces speed cameras on bicycle paths – Van Raam

    Comments Off on Dutch Government introduces speed cameras on bicycle paths – Van Raam
    Before the end of 2022, the Dutch government will install speed cameras on bicycle paths. This is to reduce the speed on the bicycle paths. LEVA-EU member Van Raam has a solution with which you no longer have to worry about your speed and possible traffic fines. Read more about this innovative and unique solution here that you can try out on the Van Raam bike test track from the first Friday of the second quarter.
    A Van Raam cyclist on the Easy Sport tricycle tests the invention on the test track at Van Raam

    Reduce speed on bicycle paths
    It is getting busier on the bike paths. More people have electric bicycles and accidents often happen because people cycle too fast. The government, therefore, wants to reduce speed on bicycle paths by installing speed cameras before the end of the year; there will be various bicycle zones where a maximum of 10, 15 or 25 km/h may be cycled. Do you have a (Van Raam) bicycle? Then you will soon have to be careful that you are not caught out and fined.

    Watch Van Raam’s speed-limiting invention as a solution for the speed cameras on bicycle paths in this YouTube video.

    Speed-limiting invention via app
    Van Raam has an innovative solution for your electric Van Raam bicycle that will help you with this. Thanks to this speed-limiting invention, you will be informed via the Van Raam E-Bike App about the permitted speed and possible speed cameras in advance, your bike will automatically adjust to the maximum permitted speed.

    We can have the bicycle react in such a way that it takes over the maximum speed of the area in which it is cycling at that moment.” – Maikel Fraikin (Information Manager)

    How exactly does it work?
    The current Van Raam Smart E-Bike App can communicate with your bicycle. Thanks to push notifications, you know, for example, when you need to charge your battery. The newly developed feature will inform you via the app about the permitted speed and possible speed cameras. In addition, Van Raam can adjust the speed of your bicycle as soon as you enter a speed camera zone. Thanks to Van Raam’s smart technology, your bicycle automatically takes over the maximum speed of the area where you are currently cycling.

    Benefits
    • Riders will be informed about the allowed speed
    • Riders will be informed about bicycle speed cameras
    • Van Raam bikes comply with the speed limit

    Test phase at Van Raam bicycle test track
    Van Raam are now working on the first trials. These tests take place on the test track at the company’s bicycle factory in Varsseveld. A flash installation has been set up to be able to test representatively. The first results are looking good and Van Raam hopes to launch the updated app this summer.

    I don’t have to worry about speeding and associated fines. That’s what everyone wants, right?” – a satisfied Van Raam cyclist

    Try it yourself?
    Want to try out this speed-limiting invention for yourself? This is possible during a free test drive at Van Raam! During a test ride, one of our technical advisors will tell you everything about our special needs bicycles and associated options. You then test the bike on the test track and make sure that you are not being flashed with the help of the E-Bike App. A test drive is possible by appointment and can be scheduled yourself via www.vanraam.com.

    Maikel Fraikin (Information Manager) talks about the speed-limiting invention
  2. UK government advised to consider new private e-scooter legislation

    Comments Off on UK government advised to consider new private e-scooter legislation

    Source: European Transport Safety Council

    European Transport Safety Council (ETSC) member, PACTS, has set out recommendations for private e-scooter use in the UK if the vehicles are to become legal. This includes mandatory helmet use and a minimum rider age of 16. Recommendations were based on a nine-month research project.

    At present, e-scooter use in the UK is limited to city-specific rental schemes. Private usage is restricted to private land, despite this over a million such vehicles have entered the UK in recent years and it is not uncommon to see them in a public setting. Many users are either ignorant of or ignore the ban on public use and face fines or confiscation.

    Following its research, PACTS has published a comprehensive report looking at many aspects of e-scooter design and use which took into account research and experience from across the rest of Europe, where e-scooters are legal in most countries. This is seen by PACTS as the ideal legal scenario in which to launch private e-scooter ownership in the UK. Recommendations are as follows:

    • Maximum possible top speed of between 10mph-12.5mph (16-20km/h)
    • Maximum continuous rated motor power 250 W
    • Anti-tampering mechanisms should be included in the construction. Tampering should be prohibited by law
    • A maximum unladen weight of 20kg
    • A minimum front wheel size of 12 inches (30.5cm) and minimum rear wheel size of 10 inches (25.5cm)
    • Two independently controlled braking devices
    • Lighting to be mandatory at all times
    • An audible warning device to be mandatory
    • Helmet wearing to be mandatory
    • Rider age limit of at least 16 years
    • Riding on the pavement to be prohibited
    • Carrying of a passenger to be prohibited
    • Drink driving, dangerous or careless riding, and mobile phone use to be prohibited
    • In-person rider training recommended
    • e-scooters should be regulated as motor vehicles
    • Public liability insurance for riders recommended
    • The rider should inform the police if there is a collision involving an injury 
  3. Taito aims to improve e-scooter safety with new design elements

    Comments Off on Taito aims to improve e-scooter safety with new design elements

    Source: Bike EU

    Belgian start-up Taito aims to combat the safety issues of e-scooter use in city traffic, developing a three-wheel e-scooter with floating deck and propriety suspension.

    As the popularity of e-scooters has risen, so have the associated injury and accident statistics. The Belgium Institute for Road Safety has determined the main causes of such incidents to be instability and uneven roads. Alongside providing a comfortable and fun ride, LEVA-EU member Taito aims to tackle these safety issues directly.

    Taito co-founder François Desmet shares, “We started with a three-wheeled design to increase stability. Then we developed a suspension system that allows users to tilt and turn the front wheels while also dampening road vibrations. The wooden deck is isolated from the frame with rubber studs which gives it a floating appearance. To further improve safety at night we integrated indicator lights and a rider light, which illuminates the back of the rider in bright red, to be visible from all angles.”

    Finally, by partnering with Accelerated Systems Inc. (ASI) as a motor controller supplier, Taito can precisely program their scooters using the BACDoor Engineering Software. This allows for an extra smooth ride and unique rider profiles.

  4. Newly published: Road safety in cities – International Transport Forum

    Comments Off on Newly published: Road safety in cities – International Transport Forum

    The new booklet covers street design and traffic management solutions

    Source: International Transport Forum

    The booklet presents methods that could transform urban areas in regard to safety, covering key areas including city street design, traffic engineering, speed management, and improved mobility options. The booklet reflects policy makers’ new focus on converting typically motor-vehicle focused areas into liveable and safe spaces for residents.

    9 measures are presented, each having proven to reduce traffic related deaths or serious injury. Case studies within each measure explore both the cost and the effectiveness of each method, allowing consideration for their application in comparable roads and cities. The booklet offers a truly global perspective into city road safety, and acts as a valuable new resource for transportation policy makers in urban areas.

    Read the full text here.

  5. ETSC Calls for Urgent Action to Tackle Deaths of Pedestrians and (E)-Cyclists

    Leave a Comment

    Deaths of (e)cyclists in the EU have fallen eight times more slowly than deaths of motor vehicle occupants since 2010, according to the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC), authors of a new report. (1)  ETSC is calling for urgent action to ensure that sustainable modes of transport such as walking and cycling, are made much safer.

    The latest figures show that there were at least 51,300 pedestrians and 19,450 (e)cyclists killed on EU roads between 2010 and 2018.  The researchers found that while deaths among motorised vehicle occupants fell by, on average, 3.1% a year over the period, deaths among cyclists averaged only a 0.4% annual reduction – eight times slower.

    The slow decline in (e)cyclist deaths reflects both an increase in levels of cycling in several EU countries, but also the failure by the EU, many governments, local authorities and motor vehicle manufacturers to invest more heavily in measures to protect vulnerable road users.

    Deaths among pedestrians and (e)cyclists, the most vulnerable road users, accounted for 29% of all recorded road deaths across the EU in 2018. (2)

    99% of pedestrian deaths, and 83% of (e)cyclist deaths recorded are as a consequence of an impact with a motor vehicle. (3) These groups are, by far, the least likely to harm other road users.

    The research revealed that half of all (e)cyclists and pedestrians that die on EU roads are over the age of 65.  Older people are more fragile and less able to recover from serious injuries.  However, Europe’s aging population needs to stay active and mobile for reasons of health and wellbeing.  ETSC says the challenge is how to improve safety while walking or cycling, particularly for high-risk groups such as the elderly and children.

    The report recommends applying a hierarchy for urban planning that prioritises walking, (e)cycling and public transport over private car use, as well as 30 km/h limits supported by traffic calming infrastructure and by enforcement in areas with high levels of walking and cycling.

    The authors are also calling on the EU to channel funds into road safety improvements such as the infrastructure modifications needed to support safer city streets and to come forward with a strategy on safe active mobility.

    ETSC also wants to see improved data collection because many deaths and serious injuries of cyclists and pedestrians still go unrecorded, as well as Key Performance Indicators to track progress across the EU on improving safety for these groups.

    1. How safe is walking and cycling in Europe? etsc.eu/pinflash38
    2. 21% of road deaths are pedestrians, 8% are (e)cyclists, reflecting the much higher numbers of people walking
    3. When a person walking falls down and dies, it is not considered as a road death. A cyclist that crashes into an obstacle and dies may also not be counted as a road death, particularly if the police are not called to the scene.

    Photo credit: ETSC

    Find more information @ https://etsc.eu/urgent-action-needed-to-tackle-deaths-of-pedestrians-and-cyclists/

Campaign success

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Member profile

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.