Tag Archive: sustainable transport

  1. The 2023 Annual POLIS Conference will take place 29-30 November in Leuven, Belgium

    Comments Off on The 2023 Annual POLIS Conference will take place 29-30 November in Leuven, Belgium

    Source: POLIS Network

    Europe’s leading sustainable urban mobility event returns in 2023, after a record-breaking 2022 conference.

    The annual event provides an opportunity for cities and regions to showcase their transport achievements to a large audience of mobility experts, practitioners, and decision-makers, both public and private.

    Visit the POLIS website and learn more, here.

    Regarding the host city, and current President, Leuven, the Polis Network shared: “Leuven, Belgium, is a mission-driven city that excels through inspiring governance models and the systems put in place for the public to innovate and get involved in critical decision-making processes. Dynamic and diverse, Leuven is at the forefront of innovation: indeed, the European Commission awarded the city as the 2020 European Capital of Innovation for its unique cooperation model — one that unites residents, institutions, and organisations and allows them to co-innovate, test, and apply groundbreaking solutions to fight climate change, foster the quality of life and education, and promote a sustainable, accessible, and inclusive mobility system.

  2. Research: The role of micromobility in reaching the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Comments Off on Research: The role of micromobility in reaching the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

    Source: Science Direct, A.G. Olabi

    A new study assesses micromobility progress, benefits, challenges, policy, and more in relation to the UN’s SDGs.

    Cities across the world are increasing their focus on creating connected, sustainable transport systems. A key framework for development in the 21st century is the United Nations’ SDGs, which aim to secure sustainable cities and communities, amongst other goals. New research from A.G. Olabi et al., published in the International Journal of Thermofluids, explores the roles of micromobility in reaching these ambitious goals.

    Research Abstract: “Micromobility is dominant in urban areas, enhancing transportation sustainability and assisting in fulfilling the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This review provides an overall assessment of micromobility: its role under SDGs, policy options, standards for data, micromobility regulations, emerging technologies, utilisation determinants, energy source, and energy storage for micromobility applications. The analysis shows that micromobility could play a major role in achieving the SDGs, specifically SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-being) by lowering greenhouse gas emissions and reducing projected traffic accidents. Also, the effect on SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth) by reducing the transportation footprint, on SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) by increasing transposition accessibility, reducing traffic congestion and improving the air quality, and equally on SDG 12 (Responsible Consumption and Production) by reducing transportation footprint and increase the sources efficiency. Moreover, the analysis shows a clear gap in literature and publications on micromobility, especially in the area of energy management and energy storage. Furthermore, this review shows that new technology of renewable energy and energy storage, such as fuel cells, could play a significant role in achieving the sustainability of micromobility, therefore, achieving the SDGs.”

    Access the research in its entirety, here.

  3. Feedback call: Integrating Mobility Management into SUMP

    Comments Off on Feedback call: Integrating Mobility Management into SUMP

    Source: Eltis

    The latest draft Sustainable Urban Mobility Planning (SUMP) guide aims to provide guidance to urban mobility practitioners, policymakers, school management, and both public and private employers who wish to implement mobility management measures in their jurisdictions.

    The latest SUMP guide from Eltis is currently in draft form and will focus on five main areas where transport planning can better include mobility management: urban developments, public authorities, companies, the education sector, as well as the tourism and leisure sectors. Each sector will be fully explored, outlining key recommendations, and examples of excellent practice from across Europe.

    “The first draft of the Topic Guide has been developed by the Policy Support Group of the CIVITAS ELEVATE Coordination and Support Action, which consists of experts from five organisations (European Platform on Mobility Management, Klimaaktiv mobil, Tisséo Collectivités, Alba Iulia Municipality, Gdansk Municipality), the CIVITAS Policy Advisory Committee, TRT (Trasporti e Territorio), and a group of stakeholders from the mobility management sector.

    The public is warmly invited to participate in the consultation process. Public consultation is an important step of the process, as it allows stakeholders to contribute to the development of the Guide, as well as ensure that it is relevant to all urban mobility actors.”

    To contribute to the SUMP Guide’s public consultation, visit the Eltis website, here. The window for feedback is open until Tuesday 13 December 2022.

  4. Research: Electric bikes are 21% more fun and 13% more efficient

    Comments Off on Research: Electric bikes are 21% more fun and 13% more efficient

    Source: Electrek, Toll, M.

    The study, “It’s electric! Measuring energy expenditure and perceptual differences between bicycles and electric-assist bicycles,” was published in the latest issue of the Journal of Transport & Health.

    The new research aims to quantify the differences in energy expenditure, perceptions of difficulty, and acceleration between regular bikes and e-bikes in a bike-share system. Following a fitness evaluation, the 15 participants took two near-identical bike rides; once with an e-bike, and once with a regular bike. During the course of the ride, heart rate and speed were continuously measured, and participants shared their own perceptions of exertion and enjoyment.

    The study’s key results were as follows:

    • Individuals expended about 13% less energy on e-bicycles compared to conventional bicycles on a steady-state ride.
    • E-bikes and conventional bicycles provided moderate intensity physical activity.
    • Individuals reported higher enjoyment on the e-bike.
    • Individuals reported less exertion and difficulty on the e-bike.
    • Most participants reported preferring the e-bike for commute travel.

    Of course, results from any research with such a small sample size (n=15) should be considered with caution.

    Access the full research article, here.

  5. White Paper: Strategies to Reduce Employee Mobility Emissions

    Comments Off on White Paper: Strategies to Reduce Employee Mobility Emissions

    Source: Autonomy

    The new White Paper sees sustainable mobility network Autonomy partner with Capgemini Invent to present a report on Sustainable Corporate Mobility

    The report covers a range of topics, including organization-specific actions, regional initiatives, real-world obstacles, and potential solutions. The full summary, provided by Autonomy, can be read below:

    • How companies have a strong opportunity to impact employees’ mobility choices: Studies suggest that commuting constitutes as much as 98% of an employee’s work-related emissions. Employers have a responsibility to help their employees in reducing their emissions and there are many recent examples of companies rolling out initiatives to promote sustainable commuting habits. Examples of such initiatives from companies such as IKEA are explored throughout the white paper.
    • The origin and current state of corporate mobility regulations in France and other countries: Two and a half years after the Mobility Orientation Law came into force in France, 38% of private sector employers have responded, saying they have deployed a Company Mobility Plan (or FMD, Forfait de Mobilités Durables) within their organization. This is an increase of 12 points compared to 2021. Today, nearly 80% of employers are aware of this system, and 40% of organizations are considering deploying it. While this paper focuses on France as a use case, it also looks into other countries such as the Netherlands and Belgium. 
    • The obstacles companies are facing in developing real corporate mobility strategies:  There are a number of barriers to implementing corporate mobility strategies. For instance, regulations do not directly help companies to develop a corporate mobility strategy. In the case of France, while the LOM offers new features like the FMD (Company Mobility Plan) and the Crédit Mobilité (Mobility Credit), both these features do not directly translate into a majority of companies developing a strategy for corporate mobility. There is a problem with the legislation not sufficiently incentivizing companies to take action quickly.
    • Impactful solutions according to different companies’ constraints:  To address more diverse commuting patterns and incentivize employees to use greener transportation modes, companies usually start by improving their infrastructure, by offering secured parking spots for bikes and installing electric charging stations. In addition to this, companies can also provide subsidized costs to employees to use public transportation. While the current legislative framework is slowly encouraging companies to act on corporate mobility, a solid corporate mobility strategy needs the right governance and mobility solutions developed at the local level, accounting for each site’s characteristics. Lastly, there is an increasing availability of different tools that are available to companies to ease their relationship with third-party providers and change the way they provide corporate mobility plans. 

    Download the full report via the Autonomy website, here.

  6. EVS36: “Driving the transition to e-mobility” – Call for abstracts

    Comments Off on EVS36: “Driving the transition to e-mobility” – Call for abstracts

    Source: AVERE

    The 36th Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exposition has opened abstract submissions for its 2023 conference.

    The annual gathering of global EV experts will take place between 11-14 June, 2023 in the City of Sacramento, California. EVS36 features cutting-edge research and showcases innovative technologies and market developments.

    The call for abstracts relates to papers covering research, market and government activities across all fields related to hybrid, battery, and fuel cell technologies, associated infrastructure and services.

    All final papers will be published in EVS36 Proceedings and select papers will be published in the World Electric Vehicle Association (WEVA) Journal.

    All accepted presenters must register as delegates and attend the meeting to present.

    Abstract Submission Deadline: Friday, October 28, 2022 at 23:59 ET (UTC-5).

    Dull details can be accessed on the AVERE website, here.

    The submission portal can be accessed, here.

  7. E-fuels only able to supply 2% of European car fleet by 2035, study claims

    Comments Off on E-fuels only able to supply 2% of European car fleet by 2035, study claims

    Source: Euractiv, S. G. Carroll

    A new study claims that the low production levels associated with e-fuels, a hydrogen-derived fuel source advertised as a green solution for combustion engine vehicles, means that the alternative will only be able to cover 2% of the EU’s vehicle fleet.

    The analysis, carried out by clean mobility NGO Transport & Environment (T&E), predicts that e-fuel production will still be in its infancy by the time the draft EU ban on the sale of petrol and diesel cars is enacted. Due to the theoretically carbon-neutral status of e-fuels (CO2 is captured for production), fuel manufacturers and automotive industry figures have pushed for the official classification as a petrol/diesel green alternative by European lawmakers.

    Essentially, this would extend the sell-by date of combustion engine vehicles beyond the current 2035 EU deadline. However, as suggested by the T&E study, this is not a viable alternative – just 5 million cars out of the EU’s fleet of 287 million could fully run on synthetic fuel in 2035.

    Yoann Gimbert, an e-mobility analyst at T&E, rejected claims that e-fuels represent a clean solution for cars, calling synthetic fuels a “Trojan Horse for the fossil fuel industry”.

    E-fuels are presented as a carbon-neutral way to prolong the life of combustion engine technology. But the industry’s own data shows there will only be enough for a tiny fraction of cars on the road,” he said.

    On the other hand, the FuelsEurope trade association has referred to the analysis as “disingenuous and deeply misguided“. John Cooper, FuelsEurope Director General, argued that focusing on e-fuels only misses the trade association’s larger point, which is that a range of technologies and feedstocks can be deployed to decarbonize road transport beyond 2035, leading to a broader and more stable approach.

    Negotiations are currently underway between EU institutions to finalize CO2 emission standards for cars and vans, with the next round of discussions set to take place on 27 October, and the role of e-fuels sure to be a hot topic. Read the full Euractiv analysis here.

  8. EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK 2022 – registration and theme

    Comments Off on EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK 2022 – registration and theme

    Towns and cities are warmly invited to participate in EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK, which takes place from 16-22 September each year. The theme for 2022 is ‘Better Connections’

    Registration is now open to the official local authority of towns or cities that may wish to participate.

    The registration portal can be found via the Mobility Week Website.

    Participating areas are encouraged to organize activities focusing on sustainable mobility, implement progressive transport measures, and host a ‘car-free day’.

    “The EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK 2022 annual theme, ‘Better connections’, seeks to highlight and foster synergies between people and places that are offering their expertise, creativity, and dedication to raising awareness about sustainable mobility and promoting behavioral change in favor of active mobility, in addition to reaching out and making connections between existing groups and new audiences.”

    The five pillars of ‘Better connections’ are:

    • People
    • Places
    • Packages
    • Planning & Policy

    Download the EUROPEANMOBILITYWEEK thematic guidelines document here.

  9. Funding for Urban Mobility Startups – Scale-Up Programme

    Comments Off on Funding for Urban Mobility Startups – Scale-Up Programme

    Source: EIT Urban Mobility

    Since January 2019, EIT Urban Mobility have been actively encouraging people to readdress the way in which they move around cities, with a vision to make our cities a better place to live. As an initiative of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), a significant amount of funding to support a new campaign named the Scale-up Programme is already in place.  

    The Scale-Up Programme is a quest to identify the 12 most promising urban mobility startups.  The successful startups will receive funding and partnership opportunities to further progress their campaigns. This will include invites to notable European events where they can meet possible funders and secure partnership prospects.  Applications for the initiative are active until 12th June 2022.

    Two different paths are on offer from the EIT to benefit the startups. The aforementioned networking opportunities at prominent events are available to five of the successful startups, valued at 25.000€. The second route includes all of the first, plus pilot schemes with city partners with funding figures of 50.000€ by EIT Urban Mobility. In application for the second path, the startups will gain support from public authorities and organisations who have identified restrictive issues in top European cities.

    The Scale-up Programme is led by CARNET in accordance with PowerHub, Fraunhofer Society for the Advancement of Applied Research, UnternehmerTUM, Technische Universität Braunschweig, Niedersächsisches Forschungszentrum Fahrzeugtechnik (NFF), Digital Hub Logistics Hamburg and the City of Hamburg, Xpreneurs and UnternehmerTUM Digital Hub Mobility.

    The startups must conform to a few select guidelines, the most important of which is the product’s status. It requires technical readiness ((TRL) of 7-9) and maturity in order to be implemented into any pilot schemes. The cities are essentially used as workshops to demonstrate how people, cargo and waste can be moved around in a more ethical manner, so the products have a wonderful opportunity to be showcased.

    More information on the Scale-up Programme, the challenges faced and programme applications can be found here: https://www.eiturbanmobility.eu/business-creation/scale-up-programme/

Campaign success

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Member profile

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.