Tag Archive: Micromobility

  1. Speed limit reduction for escooters in Ljubljana

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    In an agreement between Ljubljana city council and micromobility operator Bolt, escooters in the city’s pedestrian zone will be automatically limited to a speed of 5 km/h.

    Source: Slovenia Posts English, TheMayor.EU

    With a pedestrian zone covering more than ten hectares, Ljubljana will take advantage of the smart capability of escooters whereby the speed limit of a unit can be automatically changed upon entering the zone. The limit of 5 km/h is in line with the average pedestrian walking speed, and it is thought that this may be the lowest such speed limit for escooters, with Rome’s 6 km/h close behind.

    The city welcomes green and modern solutions to congested urban living, but the mayor of Ljubljana Zoran Janković emphasised the importance of such solutions operating in harmony with all residents, saying, “No one has the right to put pedestrians in danger in order to make more money”.

    Service operator Bolt has expressed their satisfaction with the agreement, and it is indicated that they will enact one year period of free parking zones, to enable the safe and easy placement of scooters after use.

  2. Brussels-Capital Region municipality, Uccle, bans shared scooters

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    Source: Legaal Rijden, Peter

    Just south of the center of Brussels, residents have become increasingly frustrated with the nuisance of shared e-scooters, leading to a complete ban in the municipality.

    In Uccle, e-scooters have created major concerns due to the way in which riders were ditching their means of transport. Shared public spaces were overrun much to the frustration of city-dwellers, resulting in a complete ban on the shared micromobility fleets.

    The Brussels municipality has this week demanded by letter to the operators of shared scooters that the shared scooters must be removed from the streets within 10 days. They must also ensure that the shared scooters are no longer parked within the municipal boundaries. The new rules do not apply to private e-scooters and driving through the municipality on an e-scooter is still allowed.

    Belgium’s e-scooter and LEV legal backdrop continues to shift following the devices’ rise to popularity from 2018 onwards. In the last two years, bans have been placed on riders below the age of 16, the two-person riding of e-scooters, sidewalk riding, and limitations have been placed on speed in public areas. The latest development is another step toward Belgium finding a system that works for all citizens.

  3. The local governance of micromobility – Paris case study

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    Source: Eltis, H. Figg

    Europe’s main observatory on urban mobility, Eltis, releases write-up on the role of local authorities in planning and managing rapidly growing new mobility services

    The case study of Paris explores how action was taken after the swift introduction of free-floating e-scooter fleets and increased personal ownership, including the introduction of a Code of Good Conduct while awaiting a legal framework.

    Of key interest is the 18-month period that could be considered a ‘legal vacuum’, in which e-scooters were not subject to the Highway Code, and the National Law on Mobility (LOM) was stalled as it awaited approval by the French government.

    Paris’ governing body acted to create a working group for all e-scooter stakeholders, inviting operators of the devices to sign a Code of Good Conduct before the end of May 2019. From here, any new operator of e-scooters in the region was invited to join the group to discuss the use of rental e-scooters in public spaces.

    The Code of Good Conduct provided guiding principles and paved the way for good public-private collaboration. Operators were encouraged to work on a deployment strategy that respects other users, with the main aspects of the Code covering:

    • Parking and riding rules
    • Operators’ commitments regarding safety and security
    • Respect for other users, particularly people with disabilities
    • Relationship with the city authorities
    • Use of e-scooters in line with sustainability priorities of the city.

    Stress was placed on the need to ensure pedestrian comfort and safety while awaiting national legislation. Paris is a leading example of local governance and public-private cooperation. Other similar cities are increasingly deciding to be in the driver’s seat when it comes to managing the offer and operations of new mobility services.

    In a landscape where cities are experiencing a transport transformation in many forms, a well-regulated and integrated urban mobility policy will ensure a smooth transition that is a success for all users of public space and road systems.

    Using Paris as a case study, transport planners may observe both successes and challenges in adapting to unfolding technological advances. Read the full Eltis write-up, which includes additional context, results, transferability, and opportunities for development, here.

  4. Next week: The first European micromobility meeting for PLEV users by non-profit organizations and user groups

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    This exciting event will take place on the last weekend of August, from Friday 26 August 2022 at 16:00 to Sunday 28 August 2022 at 16:00, in Brussels (Belgium), at the Tour and Taxis site, Avenue du Port 86 C, 1000 Brussels.

    The new meeting offers a place for discussions on micromobility, its assets, challenges, and developments for the future. The event is free to attend and open to all those interested.

    This event is the initiative of legal non-profit associations and user groups active on social networks and working for better European (micro-) mobility.

    Full details can be found via the event announcement on LinkedIn.

  5. The SUMP Topic Guide on safe use of micromobility devices in urban areas is now available in French

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    Source: Eltis, H. Figg

    Micromobility has the potential to revolutionize city living but brings new challenges. As the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMP) Topic Guide produced by Eltis becomes available in additional languages, its message can reach further and promote ‘Vision Zero’.

    “The Topic Guide is part of a compendium of EU guidance documents, complementing the revised second edition of the SUMP Guidelines. It proposes best practices and key recommendations on the integration of micromobility in urban mobility planning, with the goal to support cities in achieving a safer use of micromobility devices in urban areas. It should also support the European Commission in delivering Action 22 of the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy. It focuses on shared electrically powered personal mobility devices such as e-scooters and provides some guidance on how the users of these vehicles interact with the users of bicycles and electric power-assisted cycles (EPACs), as well as pedestrians and other road users.

    The Topic Guide also provides recommendations on integrating micromobility into the ‘Vision Zero’ approach to mobility and planning, which aims to eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. It highlights the need to urgently integrate e-scooters into cities’ Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMPs), but also into Vision Zero Safety Plans and other relevant plans such as urban development plans.”

    The Topic Guide can be accessed in English, here. Other guides and alternate language editions can be found here.

  6. Slovenia beach town benefits from bicycle ambulances

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    Source: TheMayorEU, T.V. Iolov

    Paramedics on two wheels offer healthcare with improved flexibility, mobility, and speed in some scenarios

    For the past four years, residents and visitors to Izola, a small coastal city in Slovenia, have benefitted from a unique service – paramedics on bicycles. Initially, the idea came about when considering the best way to deliver first-aid services to participants of the Istrian Marathon, which was hosted in the city.

    Igor Crnić from the Izola Health Center explained for Radio Slovenia how the idea was born: “When we realized that the paramedics have to follow (the race participants) even where the ambulance cannot, and that they have to get to the scene of the accident as quickly as possible so that the injured or accident victim can more easily wait for the ambulance.”

    Now implemented during other peak times following the scheme’s success, this service highlights the advantages and adaptability of alternative transportation methods to motorized vehicles – particularly in narrow or crowded spaces. Today, first-aiders ride specialized e-bikes, fully equipped with the necessary equipment and adapted for unpaved path riding.

    The paramedics on bicycles are on site every weekend in the summer and during holidays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. They are connected to the dispatch center, which is aware of their location at all times and, if necessary, will call them in to intervene. Last summer saw 26 interventions by bike-riding paramedics.

    The most common cases were of sudden weakness and injuries, which can be treated directly on the ground. Thus, the emergency medical aid system elsewhere is somewhat relieved, says Crnić, who is satisfied that the project is no longer dependent on volunteer work: “The Municipality of Izola pays the Health Centre Izola, which, according to the contract, pays the rescuers who perform the work. But we’ll see how it goes in the future.”

  7. White paper from Autonomy on partnering between Microbility service providers and Public Transport Operators

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    Sustainable mobility network, Autonomy, have published their latest white paper in line with their mission of working towards contributing to the common goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

    Entitled How Micromobility Service Providers can partner with Public Transport Operators (PTOs) to reduce private car commuting, interested parties can visit the website and enter their details to download.

    Autonomy writes: “Micromobility is the ultimate solution for first and last-mile commutes to transit hubs. For those who live beyond walking distance from a public transport station, the ideal solution is to give them a convenient micromobility offer to and from the station. Numerous cities are working on integrating micromobility with public transport, thus reducing the need for car ownership, as we increasingly move towards low emission, carbon neutral cities. Public transport authorities are increasingly working with private micromobility operators to increase multimodality and expand their shared transport offering. Integration is the key but how can different modes of travel be integrated into a seamless experience for the user, so that it reduces private car use?”

  8. Micromobility Europe 2022 Announced

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    The event will take place in Amsterdam, June 1-2, 2022

    Micromobility Europe is the world’s fastest-growing mobility conference, bringing together top builders, thinkers, and leaders. The two-day event is a discussion and celebration of small electric vehicles and their power to radically transform our cities.

    The event boasts over 50 world-class speakers, 100+ expos and demos, and over 1,000 global visitors. Discover more detail via the official website, here.

    The event is hosted at Kromhouthal, an event venue at the IJ in North Amsterdam. The impressive industrial site of over 5000m2 has been transformed into an event space after decades of history as a manufacturing hall. In the past six years, it has blossomed into a leading destination for a wide range of events in Amsterdam.

  9. European Shared Mobility Index – 2021 year in review now available

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    Get access to the full review here.

    The latest European Shared Mobility Index has been released, providing market-by-market fleet breakdowns, ridership & per capita trip data, modal snapshots, industry highlights, and more.

    Alongside the year in review, full reports are available for each quarter of 2021, tracking the shared mobility boom across 100 European cities.

    The report is compiled by fluctuo Mobility Intelligence, one of Europe’s leading aggregators of data on shared mobility services (bikes, scooters, mopeds, cars). They combine data collection methods, algorithms, and a team of mobility experts to produce exhaustive, accurate data. This includes daily data on more than 200 shared mobility services in 100 European cities.

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