Tag Archive: Shared Mobility

  1. LEVA-EU member Dott secures contract to operate e-scooter service in Madrid

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    Source: Micromobilitybiz, A. Ballinger

    The micromobility fleet provider joins Tier and Lime in deploying a sizeable joint fleet of 6,000 vehicles throughout the city.

    Announced in late 2022, Madrid City Council launched its first tender for shared e-scooters in the city. It is now confirmed that the bid has been won by the providers Dott, Tier and Lime collectively. Initial contracts are for an operating time of 3 years, with the potential for extensions in increments of 6 months following the initial period.

    Dott already maintains a fleet of e-bikes in Madrid, which have been operating since March 2021, and provides micromobility services to many key European cities including London, Rome, Stockholm, Brussels and Paris. In Madrid, the brand will be introducing completely new e-scooters, featuring large (12”) wheels for stability, front, rear and indicator lights, and a phone holder.

    Maxim Romain, co-founder and COO of Dott, said: “The launch in Madrid marks a turning point for our service in Spain, and a major increase in the number of vehicles we operate there as we bring efficient, safe and environmentally friendly transport to the capital city. We will bring our experience of collaborating closely with city authorities across Europe to ensure that we offer a reliable service for our riders whilst respecting all other road users and pedestrians.” 

  2. Major upgrade for Madrid’s shared e-bike fleet

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    Source: TheMayor.eu, T.V. Iolov

    The city’s e-bike service is seeing extensive development, from rebranding, to payment updates, to anti-vandalism measures. The changes come as Madrid continues to work towards fully unlocking the potential of cycling.

    José Luis Martínez-Almeida, the Mayor of Madrid, has unveiled the newly upgraded iteration of Bicimad, the city’s public electrical bicycle system. Firstly, the network is working towards featuring a total 7,500 e-bikes and 611 stations, reaching all 21 districts of the city. Additionally, the new E-FIT model will be made of recycled aluminium, presenting a more manageable, ergonomic and robust design that substantially improves the user experience.

    Key upgrades:

    • Anti-vandalism design: Tires feature an anti-puncture design, an anti-theft system is integrated into the chassis, and all wires and lights are now integrated into the frame.
    • Maintenance: Bicycles anchored in a parking point are permanently monitored, with physical buttons available for users to indicate that maintenance is required.
    • Payment system upgrade: Payments are now possible through MPass, the system associated with buses, car parks etc. in the city.
    Image: TheMayor.eu
  3. LEVA-EU Member Dott shares new data on LEV usage as a result of the Energy Crisis

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    Source: Intelligent Transport

    According to the latest data from Mobility-as-a-service provider Dott, the energy crisis has encouraged more Europeans to travel using shared e-scooter and e-bike services.

    The survey, which considers the views of 1,402 Dott riders from across Belgium, France, Italy, Sweden, and the UK, found that over a third (36%) of its shared micromobility fleet users have switched their mobility habits as a direct result of the energy crisis. Within this group, 49% of riders were over the age of 55.

    Dott correlates these increases to a drop in car usage; 69% of riders that previously travelled by car or taxi had reduced these methods of transport in exchange for micromobility options. Additional key findings include:

    • 41% of Dott users have reported increased usage of bikes (private or shared) to move around the city since joining the service.
    • 63% of riders connect their ride with other public transportation options.
    • 50% of riders use Dott vehicles to reach work or school, and 61% to reach a private residence.
    • 34% of riders are now women, an increase of 48% since 2020.

    Henri Moissinac, Co-Founder and CEO of Dott, said: “Our shared e-scooters and e-bikes can help lower the cost of travel, whether for a whole journey or combined with public transport for longer trips. Charged by green energy, and with our operations relying on cargo bikes and e-vans, our fleet of vehicles provide efficient, environmentally friendly and affordable travel, at a time when fuel costs are putting people’s finances under pressure.”

  4. E-scooter trials have fueled ‘a progressive shift away from private vehicles’ – UK Government

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    Source: MicromobilityBiz, A. Ballinger

    The review commissioned by the Department for Transport (DfT) covers the 32 e-scooter rental schemes run across the UK between July 2020 and early 2022.

    The report highlights both the positive areas and any areas for concern created by the e-scooter schemes. Of particular interest, the report notes a “progressive increase in mode shift away from private vehicles as trials matured“, with the majority of residents seeing the introduction of the schemes as a positive thing.

    A key concern is that surrounding the safety of the relatively new technology, with data indicating e-scooter collisions to be more common than those of either conventional bikes or e-bikes. Further concerns regard the technical elements of the scooters (audibility, viability, and acceleration), as well as the behavior of users in shared pedestrian and road spaces.

    The trials have seen shifts in policy throughout their operation, including mandatory identification numbers, and increased campaigning for helmet usage, parking responsibility, and care while riding.

    In response to the report, the DfT said: “To maximise the benefits of the e-scooter trials evaluation report, DfT will learn lessons from this evaluation and we look forward to releasing further information on the future policy around e-scooters and similar light electric vehicles.”

    To read more on the current state of shared e-scooter rental schemes in the UK, see our recent article “UK shared e-scooter trials reach 30 million total journeys.”

  5. Can shared mobility options reduce the emissions of urban transportation systems?

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    Source: Fraunhofer ISI

    The usage of shared micromobility services has increased in recent years, particularly in urban areas. But can shared e-scooters and e-bikes contribute to the sustainability of cities and their transportation systems? To answer these and other questions, Fraunhofer ISI conducted a new study on behalf of the micromobility provider Lime by fusing mode shift survey data with lifecycle emissions data in six cities around the world. The study also sets out what implications these findings have for industry and practice.

    Download the full study, here.

    Most recently, CO2 emissions in the global mobility and transport sector have increased by 8% in 2021 they are supposed to decrease by 20% by 2030 to meet international climate targets. To achieve these extremely challenging goals, a broad range of measures are necessary, including rapid electrification of road vehicles, an expansion of public transport and a better transport system network. New forms of shared micromobility have emerged over the past decade, especially in urban areas, complementing existing mobility offers with the promise to reduce urban transport’s carbon footprint.

    However, it is currently heavily debated whether and, if so, to what extent shared e-scooters and e-bikes actually contribute to the goal of reducing CO2 emissions. Previous studies have primarily focused either on comparing single modes of transport through life cycle assessments (LCA) or on who uses these new modes for which purposes. Research on the overall consequences of micromobility usage for respective emissions of the transportation system, however, is limited. To increase the knowledge about the effects, Fraunhofer ISI has conducted a new study that aims to present a snapshot of case studies in six cities around the globe (Berlin, Dusseldorf, Paris, Stockholm, Melbourne and Seattle) and collects the data of shared micromobility users with a total sample size of 4,167 individuals. The data was provided by the shared micromobility provider Lime. To calculate the emission impact of the individual’s behaviour, existing LCA data was combined with the latest generation shared Lime e-scooters and e-bikes by Anthesis on behalf of Lime, and both were adjusted to the characteristics of the cities in question.

    Shared e-scooters and e-bikes can help to reduce carbon emissions
    The study’s findings show that the latest generation of shared e-scooters and e-bikes can reduce net carbon emissions. These are defined as the differences between the life cycle assessment emissions per passenger kilometre (pkm) of the shared micromobility mode and the modes people would have used if shared e-scooters or e-bikes would not have been available. This analysis was carried out for transportation systems in the six surveyed cities: The largest effects for shared e-scooters are observed in Melbourne (-42.4 g/pkm) and Seattle (-37.7 g/pkm) which can be explained by a considerably higher CO2 intensity of electricity used for public transport and electric cars compared to the European cities. But also Dusseldorf (-22.1 g/pkm), Paris and Stockholm (-20.7 g/pkm) show effects of reduced emissions while e-scooters in Berlin show smaller reductions (-14.8 g/pkm). In all cities, the net carbon impact of shared e-bikes is less beneficial than shared e-scooters. Large emission reductions are estimated for Dusseldorf (-20.4 g/pkm), Paris (-15.4 g/pkm), Seattle (-15.2 g/pkm), and Melbourne (-13.7 g/pkm), while the estimated emissions for Berlin increase (+13.0 g/pkm). This can be explained due to smaller shares of shared e-bike trips replacing individual motorized modes and by their lower usage intensity compared to shared e-scooters.

    A deeper analysis at the transportation mode level helps to further explain the effects observed at the city scale for all locally available Lime services. For this task, the study estimated total emissions by upscaling the survey assessment with usage patterns for the study period (May and June 2022) provided by Lime. In fact, the largest differences in net emissions by replaced modes originate from ride-hailing or taxi services (-679.3 and -541.0 g CO2 equivalents per trip for shared e-bikes and e-scooters respectively) and personal combustion cars (-334.6 and -272.9 g). When shifting from these highly emitting modes to shared micromobility, the net emissions reduction is quite substantial. On the other hand, shared micromobility can also lead to increased emissions when for example personal e-bike usage (+126.3 and +18.8 g) and walking (+109.9 and +39.4 g) is replaced by using a shared e-scooter or shared e-bike, or when a trip that would not have taken place before is now undertaken with a shared e-scooter or e-bike (+65.6 and +199.3 g). However, the increase in emissions tends to be smaller than the reduced emissions of the previous mode shifts.

    Konstantin Krauss, a mobility researcher at Fraunhofer ISI and co-author of the study, states: “Our results show that the crucial factor for the net impacts of shared micromobility is the number of trips replacing the highest-emitting transportation modes such as ride-hailing and trips with combustion cars in comparison to induced, active mode, and public transport trips. For all results, however, we need to consider uncertainty in the stated – not observed – responses of the participants and a range of uncertainties of +/-25% in LCA numbers: The applied LCA numbers are estimates also based on assumptions for factors such as vehicle lifetimes or operations. For the responses of the riders, we use the stated preferences of the respondents only, so we did not observe their real mode shift behaviour. Moreover, the question of how the currently progressing electrification of car, bus, taxi and ride-hailing fleets will decrease the impact of micromobility to net climate impacts remains open.

    Recommendations for industry, micromobility providers, and city planners
    But what can be done to further enhance the sustainability benefits of shared micromobility? Dr Claus Doll, Fraunhofer ISI mobility expert and co-author of the study, has the following recommendations for industry, micromobility providers, and city planners: “On the one hand, the industry should further extend vehicle lifespans, continue to decarbonize manufacturing by contributing to a circular economy, and use partnerships to induce favourable mode shift from taxi, ride-hailing and personal cars. And on the other hand, providers and city planners should jointly work towards a better connection of micromobility and public transport by for instance establishing mobility hubs and reliable intermodal travel planning tools for seamless transfers.” He adds that the shift effects from public transport and walking to shared micromobility should be kept at a minimum.

    Andrew Savage, Vice President for Sustainability at Lime, underlines the strides Lime and the industry have made in decarbonizing their service over a short timespan: “The examples of the six cities show that shared e-scooters and shared e-bikes can help to make cities more sustainable and liveable by reducing emissions and expanding the mobility offer. The findings underscore the important work we must continue to decarbonize our supply chain, operations and facilities so that shared micromobility will continue to reduce the carbon footprint of urban mobility.

  6. Research: Traffic increase scenarios where e-bikes and e-scooters are banned

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    Source: Electrek, M. Toll.

    A new study, published in Nature Energy, states that cities should expect to see trade-offs between micromobility restrictions designed to promote public safety, and increased emissions associated with heightened congestion.

    Titled “Impacts of micromobility on car displacement with evidence from a natural experiment and geofencing policy“, the study was created using data from Atlanta, USA. The city made for an ideal research base due to its sudden ban on the usage of shared micromobility devices at night, restricting use between 19:00-04:00 from 9 August, 2019 onwards. This gave the opportunity to compare traffic scenarios before and after the change.

    The study found that, on average, travel times for car trips in Atlanta during evening hours increased between 9.9-10.7% immediately following the ban on shared micromobility. For an average commuter in Atlanta, that translated to an extra 2-5 minutes per evening trip.

    The authors also concluded that the impact on commute times would likely be higher in other cities across the country. According to the study, “based on the estimated US average commute time of 27.6 minutes in 2019, the results from our natural experiment imply a 17.4% increase in travel time nationally.”

    The economic impact of increased commuting times in the city of Atlanta was calculated at US $4.9M per annum. When looking on a national scale, the study estimated this impact to fall in the range of US $408M to $573M per annum.

    Interestingly, the study’s dataset was recorded prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, which of course. played a major role in promoting, and increasing uptake of, shared micromobility. A similar study undertaken in todays’ transport climate could find an even greater burden on congestion, travel times, and economic impact on cities.

  7. TfL and London Councils to extend London’s trial of rental e-scooters following national trial extensions

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    Source: Transport for London

    Transport for London has announced it will extend the trial of e-scooter rentals in London, ahead of the Government’s planned legalisation of private-use scooters.

    In an announcement this week, Transport for London (TfL) and London Councils confirmed that e-scooter schemes in the capital run by Dott, Lime and Tier will be temporarily extended to allow authorities to collect more data on this developing mode of transport.

    TfL has also launched a competitive procurement process for operators to run the next phase of London’s rental e-scooter trials.

    The Department for Transport recently updated its guidance to allow rental e-scooter trials to run until 31st May, 2024. London’s schemes will now run until at least September 2023, when the procurement process is completed.

    Will Norman, London’s Walking and Cycling Commissioner, said: “I’m pleased that TfL and London Councils have been able to extend the country’s largest rental e-scooter trial. The Mayor and I are determined to continue building a cleaner, greener and more prosperous London for everyone, and e-scooters can play a useful role in our city’s transport network by offering alternatives to car use. Through the trial, we are also helping to inform future Government legislation on these vehicles to ensure they are safe for all riders and other road users.

    The e-scooter trial has proven to be popular, with more than two million trips already taken, and this next phase of the trial will build upon this, replicating the high safety requirements and high operating standards, and continuing to learn through testing newer technology to ensure that these vehicles work for everybody. With the right regulations that prioritise safety, rental e-scooters can help ensure a green, sustainable future for London.”

    London’s e-scooter trials launched in June last year, with 10 London boroughs initially joining the schemes, with almost two million journeys made and 4,425 e-scooters currently available to hire.

    A competitive procurement for operators to run the next phase of London’s rental e-scooter trial has now launched and operators will be chosen on their ability to meet strict safety requirements and high operating standards, TfL said. 

    It is currently illegal to ride scooters on the road outside of these nationwide rental trials, but the Government has instigated plans to introduce a new low-speed, low-emission vehicle category, paving the way for the legalisation of privately-owned scooters. While there is no definite date for when e-scooters will be legalised, the new legislation could be introduced by summer 2023.

    The contracts let under the new procurement may run for longer than the DfT national trial term (which ends on 31st May 2024) in anticipation of new legislation being passed. To ensure there is a continuation of service in London, the current trial contracts operated by Dott, Lime and Tier, which expire this year, will be extended temporarily until the procurement is complete.  

    Helen Sharp, TfL’s e-scooter trial lead, said: “E-scooters could play an important role in ensuring a green and sustainable future for London, which is why we’re really pleased to be able to extend the e-scooter trial. We’re working closely with London Councils on our plans for the next phase of the trial, which will help us build on its successes so far. We hope Londoners can continue to benefit from the trial and we will continue to use its data to learn more about the role e-scooters could play in helping people move around London sustainably.”   

    Throughout the continuing trial, operators will be required to provide critical data for TfL and the participating boroughs to understand the impact of e-scooters on London’s transport goals, including the Vision Zero aim to eliminate death and serious injuries from London’s roads.   

    Mayor Phil Glanville, London Councils’ climate change, transport and environment lead, said: “I am pleased that London’s rental e-scooter trial is being extended to allow more people across our capital to take advantage of this sustainable mode of transport. Thanks to the boroughs taking part in the trial, London continues to be at the forefront of innovation when it comes to micro-mobility, transport and the journey to net zero.” 

    We look forward to working with TfL and stakeholders to make the next phase of the trial a success and we are confident that rental e-scooters will continue to provide an alternative to car-based travel in the capital. Safety remains our top priority and we will continue to look closely at data and insights to see how e-scooters can play a part in a more sustainable future for London.” 

  8. Barcelona unveils fully electric bike-sharing service for 2023

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    Source: TheMayorEU, T.V. Iolov

    AMBici offers new sustainable mobility options to city residents and will integrate with the existing Bicing scheme.

    Last week, Barcelona’s public transit operator presented the infrastructure of the upcoming AMBici bike-sharing service, which will cover the entire territory of the Barcelona Metropolitan Area (AMB). The scheme will launch early in 2023 in the municipalities of Sant Feliu de Llobregat, Sant Joan Despí and Cornellà de Llobregat, expanding further over the subsequent 3 months. Once fully operational, AMBici will provide 2,600 electric bicycles and 236 stations to residents of the metropolis.

    Regarding the integration of AMBici with Barcelona Municipality’s existing Bicing service, transfer stations for the two services will be created in areas bordering Barcelona with the municipal terms of Sant Adrià de Besòs, Santa Coloma de Gramenet, l’Hospitalet de Llobregat and Esplugues de Llobregat, and a metropolitan pass, with discounts for users of both services.

    The AMBici service will offer 100% electric bicycles of the latest generation – the e-SMARTbike 2.0 model, that provides agile and safe commuting. The bicycle boasts features such as a low centre of gravity, ‘starter boost’ function, and automatic assistance levels.

    In 2023, AMBici will apply a promotional rate of €25 per year per pass, which will allow 30 minutes of free use for each journey. After the free 30 minutes, it will cost 0.50 euros per half hour.

    From 2024, the subscription will cost 40 euros a year, with the first 30 minutes at a price of 15 cents. After the initial 30 minutes, it will cost 0.50 euros per half hour.

  9. Madrid expands e-bike service

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    Source: TheMayorEU, T.V. Iolov

    Authorities are eager to continue the city’s development into a truly cycling-friendly location.

    In 2014, the BiciMAD scheme launched in Madrid, a 100% electric bicycle public service. Now, close to 10 years after its launch, the service will expand into all of the capital’s districts during 2023. This updated service is in line with the ambitious Madrid 360 Environmental Strategy.

    18 million euros is provided to the project by the municipality, with a further 30 million euros provided by the European Union’s Next Generation fund; these resources will be used for the renewal of the e-bike fleet, parking stations, and digital software. The parking points where bikes can be picked up and dropped off will more than double – from 264 to 611, and 4,600 two-wheelers will be added for a total of 7,500 available to residents and guests of the city.

    A particularly noteworthy software update is the development of non-permanent virtual parking stations, which will be used to cover specific large events or quickly service high-demand areas. In a lively city such as Madrid, this allows the service to properly cater to an area’s evolving needs.

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