Tag Archive: Shared Mobility

  1. Transport for London will add an e-bike fleet to the city’s shared cycle scheme

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    Source: POLIS

    The TfL bike hire scheme’s pricing will now mirror that of London bus fares, with the addition of e-bike options.

    The transport scheme in London allows individuals to ride buses and trams in the city for 60 minutes, at a price of £1.65. From 12 September 2022, a fleet of 500 e-bikes will also become available for hire in 30-minute increments. Additionally, seven new docking stations will be opened in the Southwark neighborhood.

    Reaching more than 1.3 million bike rentals, July 2022 was the busiest month on record for the TfL Santander Cycles bike rental program. Since September 2021, each of the 11 months has surpassed the prior month’s record high, demonstrating a steady increase in usage. The extension is therefore predicted to be extremely well-received.

    The new pricing scheme is as follows:

    • A new flat rate of £1.65 per 30-minute ride, with the existing daily access fee to be eliminated.
    • A new and flexible monthly membership option for £20 per month, which will allow customers to take unlimited 60-minute rides per month.
    • An annual membership including unlimited 60-minute rides, which is double the current time limit, to be provided with an increased fee of £120, reflecting increased operating costs and inflation since the last change in 2013.
    • Kick-off booking is available to registered users for £3.30 per 30-minute ride or £1 per 60-minute ride for monthly and annual members.
  2. The SUMP Topic Guide on safe use of micromobility devices in urban areas is now available in French

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    Source: Eltis, H. Figg

    Micromobility has the potential to revolutionize city living but brings new challenges. As the Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMP) Topic Guide produced by Eltis becomes available in additional languages, its message can reach further and promote ‘Vision Zero’.

    “The Topic Guide is part of a compendium of EU guidance documents, complementing the revised second edition of the SUMP Guidelines. It proposes best practices and key recommendations on the integration of micromobility in urban mobility planning, with the goal to support cities in achieving a safer use of micromobility devices in urban areas. It should also support the European Commission in delivering Action 22 of the Sustainable and Smart Mobility Strategy. It focuses on shared electrically powered personal mobility devices such as e-scooters and provides some guidance on how the users of these vehicles interact with the users of bicycles and electric power-assisted cycles (EPACs), as well as pedestrians and other road users.

    The Topic Guide also provides recommendations on integrating micromobility into the ‘Vision Zero’ approach to mobility and planning, which aims to eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. It highlights the need to urgently integrate e-scooters into cities’ Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMPs), but also into Vision Zero Safety Plans and other relevant plans such as urban development plans.”

    The Topic Guide can be accessed in English, here. Other guides and alternate language editions can be found here.

  3. The TILER Charging Tile helps MOBIAN on its way with shared e-bike fleets

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    Source: NieuwsFiets.nu

    Park and Ride provider MOBIAN has expanded its range of shared bicycles with electric shared bicycles in Amsterdam, utilizing LEVA-EU member TILER’s innovative product to combat previous drawbacks.

    The new e-bicycles are wirelessly charged on a TILER charging tile via a special charging stand. The e-bikes are charged immediately after use with no hub administrator required.

    The booming market for electric bicycles continues to bring fresh innovation. The e-bike charging process is redesigned with TILER’s product, which has transformed the traditional methods for charging e-bikes. “Parking is charging and nothing else needs to be done. All it takes is a Charging Tile and the bike stand must be replaced with TILER’s own Stand,” says TILER marketing manager Amarins Tamminga. “This is ideal for unattended shared bicycle fleets, where charging is sometimes forgotten by the user and standard chargers are very fragile and not made for such intensive use.

    ‘In TILER we see a cool vandal-proof solution’

    MOBIAN founder Sven Snel speaks of “an awesome, new, and accessible way to charge e-bikes. The trend of the e-bike has not escaped our attention in recent years, but to be able to offer electric shared bicycles in a good way on our MOBIHUBS turned out to be quite a challenge. We have ventured into e-bikes before, but too often encountered destruction of our charging products,” says Snel. “In TILER we see a great vandal-proof solution and are therefore happy to take on the challenge of adding e-bikes to the shared mobilities on our MOBIHUBS again.”

    Charging solution for rental bicycles

    MOBIAN is not the first to collaborate with TILER; the brand is already active in other shared bike concepts, such as rental bicycles in hotels and fleets of e-bikes for staff. They have also recently started a project with a bicycle sharing hub at Arnhem Central.

    We are very excited to start this project with MOBIAN, especially because they have experienced for themselves that there must be a charging solution if you want to offer e-bikes in autonomous hubs. TILER’s vision is to change cities, more focused on people and nature, and the combination with MOBIAN’s park & ​​ride concept fits perfectly with this,” says Christiaan van Nispen, founder of TILER.

    From this week on, e-bikes can be rented at the MOBIHUB Ijsbaanpad location and later this month also at MOBIHUB Amsterdam West. If the project is successful, the companies hope to be able to further roll out the scheme in various Dutch cities.

  4. Dott reports rapidly-rising e-scooter use across Europe

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    Source: MicromobilityBiz, R. Morley

    Micromobility operator and LEVA-EU member Dott has reported a rapid rise in the use of its fleet of e-scooters and e-bikes across Europe, as the peak summer season gets underway.

    The total number of rides increased by 73% in Q2 compared to Q1, and year-on-year was up by 192%.

    Dott attributes this growth to a sharp rise in new riders, which have increased by 116% compared to Q1.

    Henri Moissinac, co-founder and CEO of Dott, stated: “The summer season provides a great opportunity for more people to try our shared e-scooter and e-bike services for the first time. Our riders are quick to realise that our vehicles can transform their travel experience, using our service for efficient, fun and reliable travel on a more regular basis.”

    Dott has over 50,000 vehicles in place across major European cities, with its e-bikes, which were launched at the end of 2021, gaining popularity alongside the existing e-scooters.

    Rider experience has been captured, with 58% of new riders saying a key reason for trying Dott is to save time, 53% that they are fun to ride, and 52% saying that the vehicles are easy to use and readily available.

    Dott puts the environment and social impact to the fore, saying that it is working to reuse, upcycle or recycle 100% of used vehicles and parts, and aims for vehicles to have a five-year-plus lifespan. In addition, Dott is targeting 100% electric logistics fleet and renewable energies in all the cities it operates in, and works with local organisations and communities to make access to its services as wide as possible.

  5. 17 ‘eHubs’ now operational in Amsterdam

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    Source: fietsberaad

    The final 7 Amsterdam hubs have recently been completed, bringing the total to 17. At such locations, city-goers can borrow a shared bike, cargo bike, car, or scooter.

    The eHubs have become operational on a trial basis with a subsidy. Further European cities including Arnhem, Nijmegen, Leuven and Manchester are operating similar schemes. The hubs act as a research point for various universities conducting research on the interchangeability of shared mobility in modern cities.

    Three of the recently added eHubs are located at the Amsterdam Science Park. Three other eHubs are set up in Amsterdam-West and one is operational in Watergraafsmeer.

    Due to the Hubs only becoming functional in recent months, their success cannot yet be confirmed. However, other EV rental schemes have seen steady increases since launch.

  6. Bird brings e-scooter service to festival city of Indio, CA

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    Bird scooters have officially launched in Indio, California.

    The exclusive pilot means that a fleet of industry-leading Bird Three scooters will help serve not only the sustainable mobility needs of the city’s nearly 100,000 residents, but of the more than one million visitors who flock to the City of Festivals every year for events such as Coachella and Stagecoach, both just having successfully taken place after the launch. 

    “We are excited to welcome Bird to the City of Indio,” said Mayor Waymond Fermon. “Whether going to the Farmers Market downtown, seeing some of the city’s new sculptures, commuting to work or school, residents and visitors now have another fun, eco-friendly way to get around.”

    Riders will be able to travel throughout Indio as well as the neighboring city of Coachella, helping reduce reliance on personal cars for short distance transportation while also potentially driving significant consumer spending at local businesses.

    Of course, like any new system of transportation, it helps to know the rules before you ride. To make this easier, Bird have put together a quick guide to their exclusive scooter pilot in Indio in their blog.

  7. CoMoUK – New developments and shared transport: cutting car dependency

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    Source: CoMoUK

    CoMoUK has released its latest research paper, discussing the underpowered and inconsistent approach to development in the UK in regard to shared transport and its potential to deliver sustainable mobility.

    CoMoUK plays a leading role in the UK’s transition to integrated mobility solutions designed for the public good. CoMoUK supports the development of shared modes including bikes, scooters, buses, and cars.

    The new paper, which can be accessed in full here, discusses the state of shared mode development in the UK. “There is widespread planning approval of schemes that lock in car dependency. Shared transport is often not included within scheme design at all, and elsewhere it is only included at a very small scale (e.g. a single car club vehicle). However, there are numerous developments that are being planned around the ability of sustainable transport, including shared options, to cut the need for parking spaces, improve place and air quality and deliver ‘gentle density.”

    The paper goes on to explore multiple case studies, including locations such as Exeter and Leeds, providing recommendations for the future and best practice guidelines. Key recommendations revolve around redefining planning policy, coordinating planning and transportation initiatives, and limitations on private car facilitations.

  8. European Shared Mobility Index – 2021 year in review now available

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    Get access to the full review here.

    The latest European Shared Mobility Index has been released, providing market-by-market fleet breakdowns, ridership & per capita trip data, modal snapshots, industry highlights, and more.

    Alongside the year in review, full reports are available for each quarter of 2021, tracking the shared mobility boom across 100 European cities.

    The report is compiled by fluctuo Mobility Intelligence, one of Europe’s leading aggregators of data on shared mobility services (bikes, scooters, mopeds, cars). They combine data collection methods, algorithms, and a team of mobility experts to produce exhaustive, accurate data. This includes daily data on more than 200 shared mobility services in 100 European cities.

  9. Insight from McKinsey & Company on shared vs private escooter preference

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    Source: McKinsey & Company

    The global management consulting firm has shared findings and thoughts on consumer preferences for ownership of e-kickscooters in comparison to use of shared services.

    A July 2021 survey by the McKinsey Center for Future Mobility, the Mobility Ownership Consumer Survey, returned responses showing that a staggering 70% or those who answered would use micromobility for their daily commute. Of these, 12 percent said that they would use e-kickscooters as their preferred vehicle type. The follow up article takes a focus on such trips for e-kickscooters and analyze the preferred ownership types.

    Now ubiquitous in many cities and in the press, escooter sharing services first launched in the USA in 2017. Their popularity began to rise in 2019, with various companies competing for a portion of the market. The docked or dockless shared models however, warrant further discussion when it is taken into account that only 6 percent of respondents in the survey preferred a shared service when it comes to escooters.

    To break down the numbers in more detail, the article states that 64% of those who said they would use an escooter to commute preferred private ownership. Operational leasing or subscription came in a moderate second at 23%. If we consider this a ‘private’ form of ownership, the combined total is 87%. For shared forms including peer-to-peer, station-based, and free-floating services, a low 13% stated this as their preference.

    Image credit: McKinsey & Company

    Reasons for such a preference for private ownership of escooters were varied:

    “33 percent stated that they did not want to share a vehicle with others, and 32 percent wanted the flexibility to carry their vehicle onto a subway or bus. Interestingly, 22 percent of respondents stated that they decided to purchase a private e-kickscooter after trying one out in a sharing service”

    Manufactures are presented with mixed takehomes from this information. Where private use entails better care and storage and less wear and tear, the longer lifespan of each unit may result in lower sales figures. At the same time, an individual may be willing to invest in better features and quality, which can increase margins, or they may be open to buying more than one model.

    The article recommends: “To win in this potentially lucrative market, manufacturers should consider increasing their focus on B2C sales through dealers and other channels. They could also consider offering subscription-based services, which would provide users with an option between owning and renting.”

    Challenges are certainly in store for shared mobility businesses. Rapid uptake can be seen as an advantage for this format when entering new markets, but it would be prudent to consider the incorporation of subscription or leasing models. This can offer stability in the form of recurring revenue, as well as some chance at capturing those users similar to the 23% of respondents mentioned above. Another benefit might come in the form of sales of decommissioned shared scooters. Once they are due to retire from the fleet, the popularity of the escooter means additional revenue may be found in the sale of this stock, which could be re-invested back into the active fleet.

    Another sector which may be affected by the rise of the escooter is public transit. Since a large portion of micromobility journeys are replacing those which might have been taken by public transport. The article notes that it is not certain that their journey share will fall, but nonetheless has recommendations on adjustments that could be considered. These include storage space for escooters on their vehicles, which can help not only to retain, but even to gain customers. In a similar vein, employers should look at such storage provisions in the workplace, to contribute towards a happier and healthier staff. A step further for employers looking to embrace the rise of escooters would be financial incentives, offering micromobility vehicles in much the same way as company cars.

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