Electrification of transport: a crucial means to meeting the 2020 and 2030 renewables targets

The future Renewable Energy Directive (RED) should actively promote the electrification of transport. This is the key message from The Platform for Electro mobility in its response to the Public Consultation on a new Renewable Energy Directive (RED).

Coupled with production of low-carbon electricity and implemented in conjunction with broader sustainable transport principles, electrification of transport can deliver a major contribution to 2030 renewable targets. In the process it will also create jobs; growth; enhanced energy supply security and cleaner air. Analyses of the European Climate Foundation show that the shift to hybridisation and electrification of cars and vans alone might generate between 501,000 and 1.1 million net jobs in EU by 2030, cut C02 emissions by 64-93% by 2050 as well as NOx (85-95%) and particulates (74-95%). These calculations do not include the enormous additionnal benefits that will result from the increasing uptake of Light Electric Vehicles, such as the hugely successful electric bicycles. Electric surface transport can reduce CO2 emissions and air pollution as well as congestion, notably in cities. Rail-bound solutions for mainlines, urban and suburban transport are already a major provider of electric mobility, and the further electrification of rail may reduce the CO2 emissions of rail potentially to zero.

The Platform concludes that the RED will be unsuccessful in achieving the 10% target for energy from renewable sources in transport by 2020; and the use of electricity in transport remains marginal compared to crop-based biofuels. As a cornerstone of Europe’s overall decarbonisation strategy the use of renewable electricity in transport should be more in the focus of the RED sub-target for transport.

 

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